Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 

Heavy restriction on French film Baise-Moi

From: Office of Film and Literature Classification

Embargo: None

Chief Censor places heavy restriction on French film Baise-Moi

French film Baise-Moi caused controversy overseas because of its shocking portrayal of violence, and the explicit depiction of sexual activity. Of particular concern was the juxtaposition of extreme violence with explicit sexual activity.

The story is about two women who meet and together embark on a violent crime spree. The film shows one of the women being raped prior to their meeting.

Chief Censor Bill Hastings exercised a little used discretionary power and called a copy of the film into his Office before it was exhibited in New Zealand.

Because of the difficult nature of the material the Classification Office consulted with Rape Crisis, Women's Refuge, STOP (an organisation that deals with male sex offenders), a university lecturer in film, and a select group of members of the public before making a classification decision.

The Chief Censor's decision allows Baise-Moi to be released under certain circumstances. The film's availability is limited for the purpose of study in a tertiary media or film studies course or as part of a film festival organised by an incorporated film society, and in both cases to persons who have attained the age of 18 years.

Bill Hastings said "This decision limits potential harm to the public while recognising that Baise-Moi has significant merit within the context of film history."

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Legendary Bassist David Friesen Plays Wellington’s Newest Jazz Venue

Friesen is touring New Zealand to promote his latest album Another Time, Another Place, recorded live at Auckland's Creative Jazz Club in 2015. More>>

Howard Davis Review: The Father - Descending Into The Depths of Dementia

Florian Zeller's dazzling drama The Father explores the effects of a deeply unsettling illness that affects 62,000 Kiwis, a number expected to grow to 102,000 by 2030. More>>


Howard Davis Review: Blade Runner Redivivus

When Ridley Scott's innovative, neo-noir, sci-fi flick Blade Runner was originally released in 1982, at a cost of over $45 million, it was a commercial bomb. More>>

14-21 October: New Zealand Improv Festival In Wellington

Imagined curses, Shibuya’s traffic, the apocalypse, and motherhood have little in common, but all these and more serve as inspiration for the eclectic improvised offerings coming to BATS Theatre this October for the annual New Zealand Improv Festival. More>>

ALSO:

Bird Of The Year Off To A Flying Start

The competition asks New Zealanders to vote for their favourite bird in the hopes of raising awareness of the threats they face. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books:
Jenny Abrahamson's John & Charles Enys: Castle Hill Runholders, 1864-1891

This volume will be of interest to a range of readers interested in the South Island high country, New Zealand’s natural environment, and the history of science. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION