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Coromandel Pohutukawa Festival a celebration

The Coromandel Pohutukawa Festival
30 November – 9 December 2001


24 October 2001


Coromandel Pohutukawa Festival a national celebration

All of New Zealand is invited to join in the celebration of a national icon at the second annual Coromandel Pohutukawa Festival, from 30 November - 9 December 2001. The festival aims to raise awareness for the restoration and conservation of the Pohutukawa tree.

"The Coromandel is New Zealand's Pohutukawa Peninsula, so it makes sense for our community to lead the celebrations of such an important and recognisable part of our national identity," says festival coordinator Jan Blake.

The festival will kick off in Thames on Friday, 30 November with The Thames-Coromandel District Council Multi-cultural Festival and the opening of the Multi Media Max 100 (Triple M) exhibition in Coromandel town.

The Thames War Memorial Hall will then host the TrustPower Primary School's Choir Festival on the evening of Saturday, 1 December. Over 300 young people from 13 local schools are expected to participate and will perform en masse an original song composed for the festival, dedicated to the Pohutukawa tree. Creative NZ are an associate sponsor of this event.

On a similarly musical note, Coromandel's Peppertree Restaurant will sway to the sounds of jazz singer Beaver from 2pm on Sunday, 2 December, accompanied by three top New Zealand musicians.

The following weekend beginning Saturday, 8 December will be action packed, starting with the Thames Crimson Market and an Open Gardens trail. Later that day at Waikawau Reserve on the Thames Coast there will be entertainment galore at the Pohutukawa Party, including performances, a market place and the Kopine Junk to Funk wearable art competition.

Festival organisers have also booked special guest Santa Claus to make an appearance at Coromandel's Christmas Parade on Saturday, 1 December, and later again in Thames on Sunday, 9 December. Other activities throughout the festival include fun family outings, sporting events, discussions, displays and demonstrations.

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"The Coromandel is ablaze with the red of the Pohutukawa flower over summer. Our hope is that the combination of the festival in this perfect natural setting will help visitors and locals alike focus on the importance of protecting this national treasure," explains Jan.

For more information about the Coromandel Pohutukawa Festival's event programme contact the Thames Information Centre on 07 868 7284 or the Coromandel Information Centre on 07 866 8598, or log on to www.pohutukawafest.com.


ENDS


For more information contact:

Lara Signal, Media Liaison
Coromandel Pohutukawa Festival
C/- PO Box 472, Thames
Phone 025 390 855 / Email larasignal@hotmail.com

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
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