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“Flightless Kiwi” Bikes The Globe

Edwin Tucker, of Papatoetoe, leaves New Zealand December 27th to begin an expedition to circumnavigate the world by bicycle.

Starting at 12 noon on New Year’s Day 2002, he will cycle solo around the world without the use of fossil-fuelled transport.

This “Flightless Kiwi” will not use planes, trains, buses or ships throughout the journey from the start and end line at the Prime Meridian at the Royal Observatory Greenwich, UK to highlight renewable energy. He will use human or sail power to cross water.

The purpose of this epic two to three year journey is to increase the awareness of the work of the charity ITDG in using technology to provide practical answers to poverty. He will also advance the virtues of cycling for people the world over.

The adventure will be documented regularly on the web site www.howsmycycling.com.

Further information can be obtained from Edwin Tucker: telephone: (09) 2788076, mobile: 021609167, email: howsmycycling@yahoo.com or visit the web site www.howsmycycling.com

Notes to editors:

Edwin Tucker, 30, is originally from Auckland and has spent the last two years in London.

He will be travelling through Europe and then on to Asia and Australasia. After reaching New Zealand approximately one and a half years after starting in London, the next leg of the journey could cross the USA to finish the expedition mid 2004. A more ambitious completion of the circumnavigation could involve travel along the Pan American Highway from Alaska to Buenos Aires and then to cycle the length of the African continent from Cape Town to return to Europe in 2006.

At this stage, planned highlights include: following the Danube across Europe from its source in Germany to the Black Sea; cycling across the highest motorable pass in the world the Khardung La at 5,400m (18,300ft); crossing the desert heart of Australia; and the Californian Coastal Highway.

ITDG (Intermediate Technology Development Group) is a UK registered charity that builds the technical skills of poor people in developing countries to improve their lives and that of future generations (www.itdg.org).

BP have provided solar panels to power a portable computer for updating the expedition journal from the road. The energy company has also funded the expedition bicycle.

SkyBitz have loaned satellite transponders to track the expedition in near real-time via the Internet when the expedition reaches North America.

Massey University will be following the expedition as a case study in sports psychology.

Ends


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