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The Bodycartography Project Presents: Lagoon

Frank Kitts Lagoon
March 10-12th 7.30pm
Koha


From the creative team that bought you the award winning 2001 BodyCartography Project at Chaffers Marina, international director/dancer duo Olive Bieringa and Otto Ramstad (USA) and composer/musician Michelle Scullion (NZ) team up once again to bring you a sixty minute visual and aural feast embracing the environment and its elements. The salty lagoon, the rolling hill, the jumping fish juxtaposed with the physical constructs of boats, stairs, bridges and ramps of Frank Kitts lagoon become the ampitheatre for a passionate theater of images, physicality and sound. Bodies flying, floating and tumbling amidst a composed and improvised soundscape of natural city sounds, Polynesian rhythms, urban drama and melodic beauty.

Olive Bieringa and Otto Ramstad hail from the tradition of post modern dance and improvisational choreography. Both having worked on numerous projects as dancers, directors, teachers in the USA, Europe and NZ.

Wellingtonian Michelle Scullion has composed for numerous dance, film, theatre, TV and radio productions in addition to her live performance work. Her 2001 composition for the BodyCartography piece at Chaffers Marina included percussion, tug boats, conch shells, metallic clanging and seagulls as an undercurrent to live and prerecorded violin and flute which rang out over the still harbor.

Performers include dancers Vicky Kapo, Gabbi Deighton, Michelle Powles, Brook Wetherall, Lisa Ellen Mills, Cathy Livermore, Kim Buckley, Stella Senior, Geoff Gilson, Maria Dabrowska, Jade Dewi Tyas Tunggal, Olive Bieringa, Otto Ramstad, Andreas Lepper, Nick Granville, Wade Sharp, Ronnie Moi, Joe Moi, Pati Umaga and Michelle Scullion.


“I’ve heard only ecstatic reports about them...”swimming in the air...dancing in the water...beautiful movers...witty wetsuits...lovely, lovely...” Jennifer Shennan, the Evening Post, March 7, 2001

"Judging by the looks of sheer exhilaration of participants and onlookers in past performances, this is what 'art' is all about. " Sarah Kinsman, City Voice, 28th Feb, 2001

For more information, raindates and more please check out our website at www.bodycartography.org


Supported by the Willi Fels Memorial Trust, WCC, Fringe Kakano fund and the Wellington Dragon Boat Festival.

Photos Courtesey of GRM Photo


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