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Transgender Pioneer Returns For Premiere

10 October 02

Media Release


TRANSGENDER PIONEER RETURNS TO NZ FOR PREMIERE PERFORMANCE OF NZSO COMMISSION

The New Zealand Symphony Orchestra presents the world premiere performance of New Zealand composer; Jack Body's commission dedicated to Carmen Rupe. This tribute to the life and personality of Carmen, transgender pioneer, featuring Australian guitarist, Slava Gregoryian, will be performed in Auckland as part of the final NZSO subscription tour in November.

NZSO Music Director James Judd will be on the podium for this fascinating concert - as well as Jack Body's Carmen Dancesone of the world's foremost pianists, Stephen Kovacevich will perform perhaps the most romantic of all the Mozart concertos - Piano Concerto No 24.

In contrast, the NZSO will perform one of the first important works to come out of the freer artistic climate in Russia following Stalin's death in 1953; Shostakovich's Tenth Symphony which portrays the strength of human emotions and passion in this post-Stalin period.

The second concert, on Saturday 2 November, presents the mastery of Stephen Kovacevich in the bold, original and brilliant work, Beethoven's Piano Concerto No 1. Kovacevich has, since the age of 20, been renowned for his Beethoven interpretations. The concert is opened by the brilliant work, Living Toys by remarkable young English composer, Thomas Adès.

Finnish composer Sibelius' patriotic Second Symphony came to represent the patriotic fervour of the country during Russia's increasing occupation, the music being both turbulent and romantic.

James Judd is the Music Director of the NZSO & Principal Guest Conductor of the Adelaide Symphony Orchestra and maintains a busy schedule of international engagements. Maestro Judd received acclaim for the highly successful NZSO Season 2002 opening tour with star violinist Vadim Repin, and for his performances of Mahler's Third Symphony. He continues to build the NZSO's reputation through his musical vision and dynamic leadership.

One of the world's foremost pianists, Stephen Kovacevich, continues to dazzle audiences with his flair and musicianship. A prolific recording artist, he has won many international awards for his Beethoven and Brahms interpretations. Stephen Kovacevich was last in NZ in 1994.

A major prize winner at the Tokyo International Classical Guitar Competition and 1998 Young Australian of the Year for the Arts, Slava Gregoryan has appeared with many of the world's leading orchestras, including the London Philharmonic and the Hallé. He makes his NZSO debut in 2002.

PROGRAMME GREAT CLASSICS The wit of NZ composer Jack Body in a dedication to one of the originals of Wellington Café Culture, the beauty of Mozart performed by a great pianist and Shostakovich's fantastic post-Stalin symphony.

NOV Friday 1, 6:30pm, Town Hall AUCKLAND

James Judd - conductor Stephen Kovacevich - piano Slava Gregoryan - Guitar BODY: Carmen Dances - NZSO Commission MOZART: Piano Concerto No 24 SHOSTAKOVICH: Symphony No 10

GREAT ORCHESTRA An introduction to the phenomenal Thomas Ades, Beethoven in the hands of a true master pianist and Sibelius's most popular symphony.

NOV Saturday 2, 8pm, Town Hall AUCKLAND

James Judd - conductor Stephen Kovacevich - piano THOMAS ADÈS: Living Toys BEETHOVEN: Piano Concerto No 1 SIBELIUS: Symphony No 2

TICKETS Tickets $70 - $20 plus concessions BOOK AT TICKETEK 09 307 5000 Or ring the NZSO on 0800 479 674


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