Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 

The 2003 Natali Prize for Journalism


The 2003 Natali Prize for Journalism

Excellence in Reporting Human Rights, Democracy and Development

A stable, democratic and secure society depends upon independent journalism and a free media.

The Natali Prize for Journalism: Excellence in Reporting Human Rights, Democracy and Development was established in 1992 by the the European Commission and is administered by the International Federation of Journalists.

The Natali Prize is awarded to journalists from the written press who have demonstrated a striking insight and particular dedication to the reporting of human rights issues within the context of the development process.

In 2003, the International Federation of Journalists will award a Natali Prize in five regions: Europe; Africa; the Arab World, Iran and Israel; Asia and the Pacific; Latin America and the Caribbean.

This international programme, which is supported by the European Commission's DG Development, is driven by professional journalistic values and judged by professional journalists themselves.

The Natali Prize
The Natali Prize is awarded annually to journalists from the written press for outstanding reporting on human rights, democracy and development. In 2003, one Natali Prize will be awarded in each of the following five regions: Europe (EU Member and Non-Member States); Africa; the Arab World, Iran and Israel; Asia and the Pacific; Latin America and the Caribbean.

All prize nominees will be special guests of the International Federation of Journalists at the Natali Prize-Giving Ceremony in Brussels in October 2003. Each prize winner will receive a Trophy and a Financial Award of €10,000. An additional Gold Medal Award will be awarded to an overall winner.

Who can enter?
The 2003 Natali Prize is open to print and on-line journalists employed by the local media in the five regions listed above. Eligible journalists should have written reports, which focus on human rights, democracy and development. Each applicant or group of applicants must submit ONE article (or a series of articles on ONE subject) published between 1 January 2002 and 31 December 2002.

How to enter
It is easy to enter. Simply fill in the Application Form and mail or fax it along with a copy of your article to one of the addresses listed below. Please read the Rules of the Competition before submitting your entry. The deadline for entries is 31 May 2003. There is no entry fee.

For all entry information see… http://www.ifj.org/hrights/lorenzo/inpr.html


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
At Bats: Locke - The World Theatrical Premiere

On the eve of the biggest challenge of his career, Ivan Locke receives a phone call that sets in motion a series of events that will unravel his family, job and soul... More>>

Other Elections: Kea Crowned Bird Of The Year

These large, green mountain parrots are known for their curiosity and intelligence. Once numbering in the hundreds of thousands, they are now classified as Nationally Endangered with just 3,000 - 7,000 birds remaining. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: Conflict & Resistance - Ria Hall's Rules of Engagement

From the aftermath of war through colonisation to her own personal convictions, Hall's new CD addresses current issues and social problems on multiple levels, confirming her position as a polemical and preeminent voice on the indigenous NZ music scene. More>>

Howard Davis Review: Another Time, Another Place - David Friesen Trio Live

"It has been said of David Friesen that he does for the art of bass playing what Pythagoras did for the triangle" - Patrick Hinley, Jazz Times. At Wellington's newest jazz venue, the cozy and intimate Pyramid Cub, the trio clicked together from the opening bars, presenting many of the tunes from their marvelous new recording. More>>

Howard Davis Review: The Father - Descending Into The Depths of Dementia

Florian Zeller's dazzling drama The Father explores the effects of a deeply unsettling illness that affects 62,000 Kiwis, a number expected to grow to 102,000 by 2030. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION