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Invites to apply for Wild Creations residencies

Artists invited to apply for Wild Creations residencies

Artists interested in undertaking the 2004 Wild Creations artist-in-residence programme, part of an exciting partnership between Creative New Zealand and the Department of Conservation, have until 29 August to submit their written proposals.

This is the second year that the Wild Creations programme has been offered. It aims to foster links between conservation and artists by encouraging them to create work inspired by New Zealand’s unique places, people, stories and natural environment.

Last year, one of the three inaugural artists selected to undertake the Wild Creations residencies was writer and performer Jo Randerson. She described her six-week residency at Te Angiangi Marine Reserve and Cape Kidnappers in the Hawke’s Bay as “an absolutely brilliant time”. “Being in these new and inspiring locations, plus having the time and space to work, has been no end of benefit to me,” Randerson said. “I produced more work than I ever thought possible and I now have a special attachment to this part of New Zealand.”

The two other artists selected for the 2002 programme were Christchurch filmmaker Zoë Roland, who chose Tiritiri Matangi Island as her location, and Auckland sculptor Christine Hellyar, who spent six weeks in Egmont National Park. Creative New Zealand Chief Executive Elizabeth Kerr said there was a high level of interest in last year’s residencies and more than 150 proposals were submitted.

“The residencies have captured people’s imaginations and reflect the way in which New Zealand artists are inspired by our wonderful natural environment,” Miss Kerr said. “As with last year, we will be looking for proposals from artists to create work in direct response to the site they have chosen.”

Julie Craig, Acting Director-General of the Department of Conservation, said the residencies were an ideal way of promoting New Zealand’s natural heritage.

“This partnership is an example of the way in which government agencies can work together for mutual benefit,” Ms Craig said. “The residencies provide a valuable opportunity for artists to create work in our protected places and they also increase awareness of New Zealand’s conservation values.”

The residencies are open to artists working in any artform and cultural tradition. It is expected that artists selected for the residencies will be New Zealand citizens or permanent residents who are professional practising artists with a track record.

The Department of Conservation hosts the artists during their residencies and Creative New Zealand provides a stipend of $5000, plus up to $1000 for travel and materials, to each artist.

A selection panel, made up of Creative New Zealand and Department of Conservation representatives, will select the three artists to undertake the 2004 residencies. The selected artists will be notified by the end of November.

For the 2004 residencies, there are 20 potential locations throughout New Zealand and artists are expected to select their preferred site before submitting their proposal. These locations are described in the guidelines and information pack, available from either the Department of Conservation or Creative New Zealand. Artists should contact Anne McLean (04-471 3182 Email: amclean@doc.govt.nz) or John McDavitt (04-498 0702 Email: johnm@creativenz.govt.nz).

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