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Strong projects from emerging filmmakers


Strong projects from emerging filmmakers

Screen Innovation Production Fund announces grants

What would a truly two-dimensional film, devoid of symbol, narrative and space, look like? To answer that question, Porirua installation artist Douglas Bagnall is creating a film-making robot with no concept of space, supported by the Screen Innovation Production Fund.

In line with its support for moving-image projects exploring digital technologies, the Screen Innovation Production Fund offered Bagnall a $19,500 grant towards the creation of his machine, which he hopes will spend its entire life as a robot-in-residence at various art institutions in New Zealand.

The Screen Innovation Production Fund is a partnership between Creative New Zealand and the New Zealand Film Commission and supports the moving-image arts by funding innovative, often low-budget productions. In its latest funding round, the Fund received 103 applications seeking $1.6 million. In the end, it offered grants totalling $248,943 to 16 moving-image projects.

The genre categories considered were experimental film, animation, short drama, dance, feature, documentary and post-production.

The assessment panel consisted of Lydia Wevers (Chair), Lawrence McDonald, Carey Carter, Veronica McCarthy and Brita McVeigh. Chair Lydia Wevers said the panel was pleased to see strong applications from talented emerging film and video-makers although disappointed at the lack of applications in the animation and dance genres, compared with previous rounds.

"One of the Fund's priorities is to support emerging talent," Dr Wevers said. "The panel was excited to receive a number of excellent applications from emerging moving-image makers and was pleased to offer the necessary support to see this potential realised."

For instance, Jason Allot (Morningside, Auckland) and Joseph Lee (Sandringham, Auckland) were offered $22,000 towards the production of Blood and Bone, a short film that pushes the boundaries of conventional drama by experimenting with visual and narrative style.

Among the other emerging filmmakers offered grants, the panel was pleased to note that there were several works celebrating or exploring the growing cultural diversity of New Zealand society.

Alex Lee (Freemans Bay, Auckland) was offered $15,000 towards producing Wong Cha Cha, the story of a lonely 60-year-old Singaporean immigrant to New Zealand who forms a friendship with a 17-year-old Croatian refugee, Ana, through their mutual love of Latin dance and music.

Zia Mandviwalla (Herne Bay, Auckland) was offered $18,000 towards producing Eating Sausage, the story of a Korean immigrant's struggle to assimilate to the New Zealand way of life in the face of her husband's opposition.

Another key priority of the Fund is its support for work by experimental or fine art filmmakers. Naomi Lamb (Christchurch) was offered a grant of $4156 towards producing Over-view. This experimental video examines the Canterbury landscape, both from above and below the clouds, manipulating imagery and sound to appeal to the viewers' senses.

Six documentary makers were supported, including Stuart Page (Grey Lynn, Auckland) who was offered a grant of $16,947 towards the production of Shustak, which celebrates the life of the artist and teacher Larence Shustak, who died in Christchurch on 15 May 2003. This experimental documentary capitalises on recent developments in digital technology and consists of a montage of animated photographs, films and text intercut with images of the subject at work and play. All this is accompanied by a soundtrack of interviews and music by the late artist, who was the founder of Photography, Film and Design at Ilam School of Fine Arts in 1973.

The Screen Innovation Production Fund also supports exceptional, innovative and non-commercial projects by established practitioners. Wellington filmmakers Campbell Walker and Mhairead Connor of Cabin Fever Productions were offered $25,000 towards the production of a feature film described as an "intense combination of realist drama and spooky suspense". The filmmakers are taking a "minimalist" approach to making the film with a stripped-down crew and no formal script.

Hamilton filmmaker Paul Judge was offered a grant of $5929 towards the post-production of Colour and Ritual: the Art of Don Driver, a documentary exploring the innovative and controversial artist.

Applications to the Screen Innovation Production Fund's next funding round close on Friday 25 July 2003. Copies of the Funding Guide: Ngä Pütea 2003-2004 are available from Creative New Zealand offices or can be downloaded from the publications page of its website ( http://www.creativenz.govt.nz).

ends

A complete list of the Screen Innovation Production Fund grants follows.

Screen Innovation Production Fund

The complete list of grants in this funding round:

$22,000 to Jason Allot (Morningside) & Joseph Lee (Sandringham) of Auckland: towards the production of a short film, Blood and Bone

$19,500 to Douglas Bagnall of Porirua, Wellington: towards the production of an experimental installation, A Filmmaking Robot

$25,000 to Campbell Walker & Mhairead Connor of Cabin Fever Productions, Central Wellington: towards the production of a feature film, Untitled Cabin Fever Film

$5,920 to Paul Judge of Hamilton: towards the post-production of a documentary, Colour and Ritual: the Art of Don Driver

$14,000 to Jumping Dog Pictures of Central Wellington: towards the post-production of a documentary, Frodo is Great ... Who Is That?

$15,000 to Tearepa Kahi of Te Atatu North, Auckland: towards the production of a short film, A Gift to Zion

$20,000 to Jonathan King of Newtown, Wellington: towards the production of a short film, Chogar

$4,156 to Naomi Lamb of Riccarton, Christchurch: towards the production of a short experimental film, Over-view

$15,000 to Alex Lee of Freemans Bay, Auckland: towards the production of a short film, Wong Cha Cha

$18,000 to Zia Mandviwalla of Herne Bay, Auckland: towards the production of a short film, Eating Sausage

$7,500 to Briar March of Henderson, Auckland: towards the production of a documentary, Allie Eagle

$16,947 to Stuart Page of Grey Lynn, Auckland: towards the production of a documentary, Shustak

$21,550 to Martin Rumsby of Manurewa, Manukau City: towards the production of an experimental documentary, Theo Schoon

$23,500 to Bridget Sutherland of Napier: towards the production of a documentary about musician David Kilgour

$20,000 to Yvette Thomas of Grey Lynn, Auckland: towards the production of a short film, The Lost One

$870 to Dean Hapeta of Raumati, Kapiti Coast: towards the costs of tape copying, Ngä Tahi - Know the Links

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