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One in Three Programmes is New Zealand-made

17 May 2004

Media Release

One in Three Programmes is New Zealand-made

A third of the programmes screened on New Zealand television last year were locally produced, according to a survey report released by NZ On Air today.

NZ On Air compiles the Local Content Survey every year, and the 2003 report shows that local content levels remain strong – close to the record levels achieved across New Zealand’s free-to-air channels in 2002.

“This is a great result,” said NZ On Air Chief Executive Jo Tyndall. “The 33.1% figure for 2003 is slightly down on 2002, but the decrease is due to a reduction in sport on TV, which was abnormally high that year. It’s the second highest result on record.

“One of the most heartening findings in this report is the increase in children’s programmes – up by 81 hours on the previous year,” she said.

“We are delighted with that result. Our most recent audience research shows us clearly, people think local children’s programmes are crucial in developing a sense of New Zealand’s culture when children are constantly bombarded with programmes from the US.”

This year’s Local Content report measures television screened between 6am and midnight, in line with the measurement base agreed by the Television Local Content Group set up at the end of 2002.

“TV One, TV2 and TV3 have all exceeded the targets they agreed to for 2003,” Ms Tyndall said. “Local content on TV One reached 54.6%, TV2 24.3% and TV3 20.4%, against targets of 52%, 17% and 20% respectively.”

Other significant findings from the report include:

- Total hours of New Zealand programming on the three channels amounted to 6,675 (compared to 7,201 in 2002 and 6,190 in 2001);
- Prime time local content hours increased by 6% over 2002;
- Documentary and Mâori programming increased;
- NZ On Air contributed funding to 23% of the locally produced programming, with more NZ On Air funded programmes screening in prime time.

“Our research confirms that New Zealanders want to see home grown programmes on television,” Ms Tyndall said. “Continuing support from Government, and the broadcasters’ commitment to screening those programmes, will ensure we can see them.”

ends

This media release and the New Zealand Television Local Content Report 2003 are available on the Internet at http://www.nzonair.govt.nz

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
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