Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search


Baumgartner jumps from world's highest bridge


Felix Baumgartner jumps from world's highest bridge

Click for big version

Picture: Bernhard Spoettel

Austrian Felix Baumgartner, known for his Channel crossing in 2003, jumped from the highest bridge in the world (maximum height at the top of the pillars: 343 metres), which was recently completed near Millau in southern France. In order to avoid bridge security, the 34-year-old skydiver climbed a 230-meter-high column unsecured in the middle of the night on Sunday 27th June.

The highest bridge in the world near Millau won’t be opened until November but the BASE jumper, Felix Baumgartner from Austria, could not wait and conquered it already on Sunday, June 27. The two carriageways of the 2.5 km long construction were just connected at the end of May. The bridge stretches across the river Parne and is so high that the Eiffel Tower would fit under it. The former World Champion in BASE jumping read about it in the newspaper, arrived there only hours later and had 48 hours to complete his mission successfully.

During the first night he checked out the situation and at 1am during the second night the all-rounder started his climb. As both sides of the bridge were heavily guarded, Baumgartner was forced to climb up a 230-meter-high column. Since construction is going on 24 hours a day and the containers for the hundreds of workers are situated directly under the bridge, he dressed in black overalls in order to avoid being spotted. Just as when he made his now legendary jump off the Christ Statue in Rio de Janeiro - where he used a crossbow to shoot the rope over the arm of the statue and then climbed it - the ascent in Millau was at least as hard as the jump itself.

"I wasn't secured and could only hold on to a steel rail", said the 34-year-old.

Picture: Bernhard Spoettel

After spending the night hidden under the road in the steel formwork, he received the text message "all clear" from his cameraman and at 7 am he jumped from the highest point of the bridge with his characteristic back flip.

"It's athletic ambition," said Baumgartner, explaining his motivation for such dangerous actions.

”Ultimate jumps are for me what World Championships are for others."

After the highest building in the world, the Petronas Towers in Malaysia, which he was the first to jump in 2000, Felix Baumgartner can now put down the highest bridge in the world on his score list.

Picture: Bernhard Spoettel


© Scoop Media

Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines


6-11 October: New Zealand Improvisation Festival Hits Wellington

Wellingtonians will have a wide selection of improv to feast on with a jam packed programme containing 22 shows, three companies from Australia, two companies from Auckland, one from Nelson, one from Christchurch and seven from Wellington. More>>


Bird Of The Year: New Zealanders Asked To Vote For Their Favourite Native Bird

Te Radar, David Farrier, Heather du-Plessis Allan and Duncan Garner are just some of the New Zealanders championing their favourite native bird in Forest & Bird’s annual Bird of the Year competition, which kicks off today.. More>>


Werewolf Film: It Follows - Panic In Detroit

Philip Matthews: When you heard last month that Wes Craven had died and you wanted to pay homage, you could have sat down with any one of five of his films that helped reinvent American horror at least three times over three decades... Or you could just have watched one of the greatest recent horror films that would probably not exist without Craven. More>>


Werewolf Music: Searching For The White Wail - On Art Pepper, etc

If the word ‘hipster’ means anything – which it arguably doesn’t – it seems to be more of an impulse than a condition. One always headed for the margins, and away from the white-bred, white-bread mainstream... More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: Leonardo da Vinci - The Graphic Work

The breadth of da Vinci’s work is incredible: from animals to weaponry, architecture to fabric, maps to botany. The works have been divided into themes such as Proportion Drawings, Anatomical Drawings and Drawings of Maps and Plans. Each section begins with a short essay. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: James Hector: Explorer, Scientist, Leader

Publication of this comprehensive 274-page account of the life and work of James Hector by the Geoscience Society of New Zealand marks the 150th anniversary of James Hector’s appointment as New Zealand’s first government scientist. More>>

On Shoestrings And Phones: Rossellini And Contemporary Film

Howard Davis: Roberto Rossellini's Neo-Realist Rome, Open City provides some fascinating technical parallels to Tangerine, an equally revolutionary Independent movie made exactly seventy years later. More>>

Get More From Scoop



Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news