Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Maori Musician Woos International Audiences


Maori Musician Woos International Audiences

Maori language recording star Whirimako Black has been invited to perform on BBC radio in the United Kingdom in early September after wooing audiences at a pre-Olympic Games concert in Athens.

The Tui Award-winning singer-songwriter performed with internationally acclaimed world music act 1 Giant Leap at the European Music Day festival on June 21 as well as spending more than 10 hours the following day recording two new songs in Maori for the band's second album.

Whirimako - who released her third album of contemporary Maori music, 'Tangihaku', locally with Mai Music at the end of May - featured on two tracks on the debut 1 Giant Leap album which went on to become a runaway best-seller on the world music scene.

Mai Music general manager Victor Stent says the organisers of the Athens concert were so impressed with Whirimako that they offered her a special solo spot on the bill of the main concert.

One of her new songs will now be released on a UK compilation and she's been invited to the UK for media interviews and the live performance on BBC radio. Victor says she's already received invitations from musicians from Greece and Ghana to collaborate on future projects.

"In less than 48 hours, Whirimako travelled from local artist to world music star," Victor says. "The compliments from those who heard her new album came from singers and musicians of every nationality, proving the power of great original music to cross all barriers and languages.

"This has also been a triumph for te reo and tikanga Maori - Whirimako's extraordinary ability to communicate her values and the beauty of her language in both the way she acquitted herself and in her moving vocal performance has left an indelible impression on the people of Athens."

Victor says the principals of 1 Giant Leap - Jamie Catto and Duncan Bridgman - have pledged their support to bring Whirmako's new album 'Tangihaku' to the world. They will soon sell it from their own personal Spacious Music website while they're already letting their fans know of its existence via the internet.

'Tangihaku' presents the Auckland-based musician in an intimate recording with young acoustic guitarist Joel Haines and her long-time collaborator, Justin Kereama, on taonga puoro (traditional instruments).

The album is based on a collection of poems written by her mother, Anituatua Black, and sister, Rangitunoa Black, set to music composed by Whirimako and her sister, and subsequently arranged for these sessions by Joel Haines.

Of Ngai Tuhoe, Ngati Tuwharetoa, Ngati Ranginui, Kahungunu, Te Whakatohea, Te Whanau-a-Apanui, Te Arawa, and Ngati Awa descent, Whirimako won Best Maori Language Album at the 2001 NZ Music Awards for her debut album, 'Hinepukohurangi: Shrouded in the Mist'.

'Tangihaku' is released by Mai Music - part of the Mai Media stable of companies owned by Ngati Whatua - and is distributed in New Zealand by Out There Distribution.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

NZ On Air TV Funding: More Comedy Comes Out Of The Shadows

Paranormal Event Response Unit is a series conceived by Jemaine Clement and Taika Waititi as a TV spin-off from their highly acclaimed feature film What We Do In The Shadows. More>>

ALSO:

Mars News: Winners Announced For The 2016 Apra Silver Scroll Awards

Wellington singer-songwriter and internationally acclaimed musician Thomas Oliver has won the 2016 APRA Silver Scroll Award with his captivating love song ‘If I Move To Mars’. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Salt River Songs by Sam Hunt

Colin Hogg, a longtime comrade of Sam, writes in his Introduction that, ‘There is a lot of death in this collection of new poems by my friend Sam Hunt. It’s easier to count the poems here that don’t deal with the great destroyer than it is to point to the ones that do.’ More>>

Electronica: Restoring The World’s First Recorded Computer Music

University of Canterbury Distinguished Professor Jack Copeland and UC alumni and composer Jason Long have restored the earliest known recording of computer-generated music, created more than 65 years ago using programming techniques devised by Alan Turing. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Almost Getting Away With Murder

The Black Widow by Lee-Anne Cartier: Lee-Anne Cartier is the sister of the Christchurch man found to have been murdered by his wife, Helen Milner, after an initial assumption by police that his death, in 2009, was suicide. More>>

Howard Davis: Triple Echo - The Malevich/Reinhardt/Hotere Nexus

Howard Davis: The current juxtaposition of works by Ralph Hotere and Ad Reinhardt at Te Papa perfectly exemplifies Jean Michel Massing's preoccupation with the transmigration of imagery in a remarkable triple echo effect... More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news