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Natural History Film Festival Of Colour

Natural History Film Festival Announced as Part of Festival of Colour


Natural history filmmakers from around the world are heading to Lake Wanaka in April for the first ever WildSouth Film Festival as part of Wanaka’s exciting new arts festival, the Festival of Colour.

This vibrant gathering of filmmakers will attract industry leaders from all parts of the world, but there will be a special focus on southern Africa, southern Asia, Australia, New Zealand, the Pacific and Latin America.

"We want WildSouth to become for Southern Hemisphere wildlife and natural history filmmakers what Sundance is for feature filmmakers: a place that provides an identifiable community, a place that pushes the boundaries and a place that is the spawning ground for new talent," said Associate Professor Lloyd Spencer Davis, Chairman WildSouth.

WildSouth is designed to appeal to all those who share an interest in making films about the region. During four golden autumnal days in Wanaka, WildSouth will run from 25th to 29th April 2005 and those who attend will have a unique opportunity to be part of: A showcase of the latest and greatest films from the Southern Hemisphere An exchange of ideas and techniques Exploring new ways of telling stories and finding audiences. Developing strategies for encouraging more films about the area, Networking in the centre of 'Middle Earth' Not to mention enjoying the performances and art of the Festival of Colour
Southern Lakes Festival of Colour director, Philip Tremewan said he was delighted to be working in partnership with WildSouth.

“We are pleased to be able to show some of the exciting new natural history films during the Festival of Colour and also to have the opportunity to host a public session with one or two of their prominent keynote speakers,” he said.

In addition to highlighting films about southern wildlife, peoples and places, the Film Festival's main aim is to encourage new and emerging filmmakers by giving them a voice and a venue, and by bringing them into close, informal contact with key executives and top producers.

The WildSouth Film Festival will bring together filmmakers, broadcasters, educators, scientists and storytellers. Films will be shown at the famously funky Cinema Paradiso, where participants can enjoy the spectacle of Southern Hemisphere natural history from the luxury of old couches and, even, the back seat of a yellow Morris Minor. Workshops and seminars will be held at the Edgewater Resort on the shores of Lake Wanaka. And, of course, the whole lot will be mixed with a generous serving of southern hospitality.

The inaugural Southern Lakes Festival of Colour will take place in Lake Wanaka from 27th April to 1st May 2005. Both festivals will be biennial. The Film Festival is supported by Natural History New Zealand and the University of Otago.

More information can be obtained on the two websites www.festivalofcolour.co.nz and www.wildsouthfestival.org.

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