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Christmas in the Park: a roaring good show

Coca-Cola Christmas in the Park: a roaring good show

Jay Laga'aia, from the Australian production of Disney’s ‘The Lion King’ in Sydney, will perform a powerful rendition of ‘Can You Feel the Love Tonight’ at Coca-Cola Christmas in the Park in Auckland on 11 December 2004.

The song, which was written and originally performed by Sir Elton John, became famous as part of the soundtrack to the Disney animated feature. ‘In The Lion King’, Jay plays the part of Mufasa, father to the lion club Simba. That means he doesn’t normally get the opportunity to sing ‘Can You Feel the Love Tonight’, although he feels a deep affinity with the music.

“This song is very moving, and performing it an event like Coca-Cola Christmas in the Park where so many people come to enjoy music and to celebrate Christmas, is going to be a fantastic experience,” he says.

Jay is best known in New Zealand for his characters on top-rating television dramas such as Street Legal, Water Rats, and Xena Warrior Princess. His hectic schedule with ‘The Lion King’ includes eight performances a week, so Coca-Cola Christmas in the Park also doubles as a chance for him to spend several days in New Zealand with his family.

Coca-Cola spokesperson Annette Chillingworth says the Jay Laga’aia is one of several in the bright young line-up of talent at this year’s event. “Coca-Cola has supported New Zealand music for many years. The talent at this year’s Coca-Cola Christmas in the Park ranges from school aged youth through to veterans of the music industry and the line up is a great reflection of how far we have come.”

Proceeds from Coca-Cola Christmas in the Park 2004 will benefit Youthline and funds will go towards Youthline’s nationwide youth help line, internet based information services, health promotion and youth and community development programmes. Youthline is the first point of contact for thousands of young people seeking help.

Goldenhorse will also be joining the Coca-Cola Christmas in the Park gang. Goldenhorse are one of New Zealand’s most popular and appealing bands: their song ‘Maybe Tomorrow’ was the most performed New Zealand song on radio for 2003, and sales of their debut album ‘Riverhead’ have gone Triple Platinum. Coca-Cola Christmas in the Park is hosted by Jeremy Corbett, Kelly Swanson-Roe and Petra Bagust.

Ends

Coca-Cola Christmas in the Park 2004 Saturday, 11 December 2004 - Auckland Domain - Auckland

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