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New Ag Art Wear® category keeps with tradition

7 May 2005

For immediate release

New Ag Art Wear® category keeps with tradition

A new category in Fieldays’ Ag Art Wear® competition has been introduced to allow for garments made with traditional structure.

Ag Art Wear coordinator Jessica Pantoja-Sanders said the “designer” category, which has been introduced alongside avant garde, under 21 and Landcare sections, will include entries “that could possibly be worn if they were to be made with non-agricultural materials.”

“Garments entered into this section will still need to be made with products, by-products or equipment from the farm, and they still need the “WOW” effect that our judges will be looking for,” she said.

With 65 entries received for this year’s competition, Mrs Pantoja-Sanders said Ag Art Wear choreographer Jenny Hansen is incorporating quick changes in preparation for the daily shows.

“And no doubt we will have models huddled by the heaters in our final rehearsals approaching,” she said.

Ag Art Wear is an agricultural fashion award competition, where designers are asked to create a garment out of products, by-products and equipment “found” on the farm.

“The idea is for designers to create a piece of art that can be mounted on the body.”

“It has been exciting to see Fieldays exhibitors getting behind this the competition. A few exhibitors have paid entry fees and provided materials for designers to make garments using their products,” Mrs Pantoja-Sanders said.

“This is really great to see, as designers cannot always source the products, by-products and equipment they need to make their garments.”

Ag Art Wear will show three times daily in the Spantech Pavilion over Fieldays, 15–18 June. For more information on the Ag Art Wear competition, contact Jessica Pantoja-Sanders on 07 843 4499 or competitions@fieldays.co.nz

ENDS 7 May 2005

For immediate release

New Ag Art Wear® category keeps with tradition

A new category in Fieldays’ Ag Art Wear® competition has been introduced to allow for garments made with traditional structure.

Ag Art Wear coordinator Jessica Pantoja-Sanders said the “designer” category, which has been introduced alongside avant garde, under 21 and Landcare sections, will include entries “that could possibly be worn if they were to be made with non-agricultural materials.”

“Garments entered into this section will still need to be made with products, by-products or equipment from the farm, and they still need the “WOW” effect that our judges will be looking for,” she said.

With 65 entries received for this year’s competition, Mrs Pantoja-Sanders said Ag Art Wear choreographer Jenny Hansen is incorporating quick changes in preparation for the daily shows.

“And no doubt we will have models huddled by the heaters in our final rehearsals approaching,” she said.

Ag Art Wear is an agricultural fashion award competition, where designers are asked to create a garment out of products, by-products and equipment “found” on the farm.

“The idea is for designers to create a piece of art that can be mounted on the body.”

“It has been exciting to see Fieldays exhibitors getting behind this the competition. A few exhibitors have paid entry fees and provided materials for designers to make garments using their products,” Mrs Pantoja-Sanders said.

“This is really great to see, as designers cannot always source the products, by-products and equipment they need to make their garments.”

Ag Art Wear will show three times daily in the Spantech Pavilion over Fieldays, 15–18 June. For more information on the Ag Art Wear competition, contact Jessica Pantoja-Sanders on 07 843 4499 or competitions@fieldays.co.nz

ENDS

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