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Frontseat, this Sunday 12th June 2005

Frontseat, this Sunday 12th June, 10.30pm TV One Finalist – Best Television Current Affairs Programme, Qantas Media Awards

et.al., ET AL AT THE 51ST VENICE BIENNALE: The furore over the "donkey in a dunny" began a long year ago. And while those involved in choosing and presenting the art collective known as et. al. feel vindicated, editorials and letters to the editor indicate there’s still a way to go if they want the artist(s) to win the hearts of those back home. Meanwhile the Prime Minister was assured that et.al. would meet their media obligations in Venice - did they?

Josie McNaught captured the parties, the reviews, the scandals, and the elusive et. al. folk, in Venice, while Oliver Driver asks Creative NZ head Elizabeth Kerr “what next?”.

STRONG ADVICE FOR ORCHESTRAS: The Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra says it’s in need of a serious cash injection unless local councils come to the party. Meanwhile, the NZ Symphony Orchestra got the boost it was asking for in this year's Budget. And across the Tasman, a major report by businessman and orchestra lover James Strong suggested that orchestras in Tasmania, South Australia and Queensland needed radical downsizing to stay afloat. Jeremy Hansen talks to Strong and the orchestras.

WELLINGTON ARTS CENTRE: Wellington City Council has opened a new arts centre to house local artists and arts groups including those made homeless by the removal of cheap accommodation for the Inner-City Bypass. Frontseat finds out who’s moved in so far, and how they feel about knocking along beside each other?

ALSO… ARTSVILLE, THIS SATURDAY: Artsville features a warts and all documentary, directed by Emma Robinson O’Brien, from behind the scenes of the Lexus Song Quest, including the final. Saturday 18th, 9.50pm, TV One.

Best regards, The Frontseat Team TV One, Sunday Nights

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