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Dunedin Arts and Cultural Events

Dunedin Arts and Cultural Events

October 2005 to November 2005

Following is a schedule of confirmed events in the City of Dunedin. The Dunedin City Council (DCC) City Marketing distributes the information on behalf of the attractions that appear below. Please contact event organisers directly for further information and confirmation of dates and times.

October 2005

Blue Oyster

Ina Johann - Trans

Painting, drawing, three dimensional works, and time based media: all are fused in their interest, presenting the viewer with an experience of imagery based on observation in transit. Instead of wanting to perfect the view, Johann treats the process of recording as an analogue to human memory with its contingent, shifting and subjective viewpoints. In this body of work she uses light as an infusing medium that permeates first her layered imagery and then the darkened space of the gallery, providing an intimacy that can also be slightly intimidating. A series of three-dimensional light works situates the viewer among shifting landscapes of image and information, somewhere in between decoding and encoding. Here observation is melded to object in an unstable amalgam, discrete pieces seem infused with tension, like moments paused in the recording process, rigid forms poised for the change which the presence of the viewer alone can catalyse. The video piece shown in the dark gallery, a collaboration between Johann, writer Sally McIntyre, and composer Ryan Smith expands on these ideas, to see a flow of information interrupted with shards and stutters. The structure of the piece isn’t linear but accumulative and musical, progressing in the refrains of the writing, which are in turn fragmented by audio editing, seeding a stuttering through the piece at the point when the writing becomes voice. This is mirrored by the pixilated in-camera editing of the video, and the glitch based nature of the sound. This piece was born through a shared interest in audiovisual collaborations in live sound arenas, where, ideally, the meeting of music and visuals is dialectical and works from the structural level.

Runs until 1 October 2005

Blue Oyster Upper Gallery and Dark Side

Ana Terry - Terminal Eden

Dunedin artist Ana Terry has begun to establish a sculptural vocabulary that manipulates found objects to both enlarge and alter their associative presence. In this project she will be working with obsolescent technology that she has intercepted on its way to the dump, exploring and critiquing an increasingly insatiable and insanely unsustainable production and consumption of technology. Terry intends to rework the cast-off items manipulating their surfaces and interiors so that the objects are ‘reactivated to generate a sense of pathos’ with a beauty and superseded ugliness that may unplug perceptions. Terry’s Terminal Eden is a place where our desires are recognised, the lure of technology is acknowledged but the hardware may also have the power to interrupt our composure. Terry intends to ‘intimately tease out’ our individual response and responsibility within a much broader global process of western capitalism. She also proposes to work with video and audio in the project to develop the possibilities in the sculptural work.

Runs until 1 October 2005

Blue Oyster Lower Gallery

Robin Neate

Robin Neate intends to extrapolate from and build on a project that he showed as part of the Sampler Series at Physics Room in 2004. Neate explores things ‘uncool’, out of fashion, neglected, and handmade. Using and combining styles and conventions from the past the way other artists use found objects, he asks the question “…if by its own definition popular culture is already ‘known’… what is unpopular culture?” Neate proposes to build something large and amorphous that has its beginnings in modernist form but wilfully refuses to resolve in a way the moderns would have approved of. As he puts it, “it will appear as if it is assuming form but isn’t quite there yet.” This proposed amorphous sculpture that he imagines will dominate the gallery space has already been pre titled Hamlet as a way of layering a literary allusion onto the already intentionally murky aesthetic. He intends to flank Hamlet the sculpture with various paintings or photographs that pull in other quite specific artistic and literary references, chosen for intuitive reasons and presented in a ‘pseudo biographical fashion’. Another element Neate wants to introduce is a bar leaner, placed conveniently for any visitor to while away the hours and miss opportunity after opportunity as they contemplate the themes of Hamlet. In the artist’s own words, “hopefully, somewhere along the line, I manage to transform these points of departure into renewed forms of expression.”

4 - 22 October 2005

Blue Oyster Lower Gallery

Lynn Plummer, Rodney Browne and Kushana Bush - Body/Space/Ritual; Texts

Three Dunedin artists Lynn Plummer, Rodney Browne and Kushana Bush ask: what do we reveal that is not conscious or rational in the interrelationship between Body, Space and Ritual and what diverse Texts might result from this interaction. The task is to acknowledge the influences underpinning our enmeshment with ritual and space, which is governed by our understanding of ourselves through the complex concepts of the private and the public body. Each artist engages with one of the paradigms of the conceptual triangle, while still considering the other two. Thus a text spreads from each model, into the space and shapes multiple readings. Rodney Browne’s ephemeral installation plays with perceptions of space. Ritual-type structures delineate the body in space, while lyrically extending its presence beyond into a sense of the contemplative space. Lyn Plummer’s small sculptural installation comments on rituals connecting land and body marking to a space defined by ‘the sense of place’, developed from insights from Arnhemland Australia, and Papua New Guinea. Kushana Bush’s series of drawings focuses on the body in extension to interior space and private ritual. They confront domestic bodies fraught with dissonance and anxiety by depicting a private stage rife with erratic and often hyperbolic dramas.

4 - 22 October 2005
Blue Oyster Upper Gallery

Nick Dewar - kkshshshhhhhhh

Multimedia artist Nick Dewar presents a body of work primarily about how humans construct much of their reality around information gathered from the readily available domestic transmitter of information - the television. Dewar’s ideas are informed by Noam Chomsky and Edward S Herman, considering television as a form or social conditioning or formatting that is both cynically manipulated and manipulative. The work will consist of digital work that uses static, white noise and bad reception in order to coat the exhibition space in the familiar flickering that television offers. Other work will include a series of paintings on old school desk lids, a nostalgic reference to the early naïve assumptions about television as a way to discover and report the truth.

4 - 22 October 2005

Blue Oyster Dark Side

Jenny Gillam - In Dark Trees / August Moon

Wellington based Jenny Gillam displays work from an ongoing series developing a photographic investigation of post-colonial New Zealand. The work draws on cinematic aesthetics appropriated from the golden age of Hollywood and science fiction both contemporary and retro. The science fiction sources introduce an undercurrent of anxiety, a sensation of post apocalyptic shift away from New Zealand kitsch to something Gillam describes as ‘antipodean gothic.’ In this project wild New Zealand landscapes replace inherited European gothic iconography from traditions of psychological horror. Nature becomes an uncanny representation as a force beyond human control where a violent and repressed past returns to haunt the present.

25 October - 12 November 2005

Blue Oyster Upper Gallery

Andreas Pytlik - Green for NZ, Watching the Sea

German sculptor Andreas Pytlik uses the colour green as a vehicle for his ideas, which are located somewhere in a minimalist practice that is phenomenologically concerned… Or more clearly that he is interested in the associative power of a ‘simple’ unifying element such as a colour. His work takes the form of time based and social interactions as well as more traditionally defined static art gestures such as sculpture or painting. In all of his work he uses the colour as a place of transaction, where his respondent negotiates their own ground within the work. For Green for NZ, Watching the Sea Pytlik proposes to link two sites, the harbour and the gallery with an installation. He talks about changing an everyday item a few degrees by changing its colour. The item is a small dingy and the colour of course is green. The boat is the centre of the exhibition and combined with the other elements of the project brings another place-ness and refers to the idea of travel. Viewers are invitation to look out at different vistas and are offered the means to go there.

25 October - 12 November 2005

Blue Oyster Lower Gallery

Blue Oyster Gallery, Basement, Moray Chambers, 30 Moray Place, Dunedin

Contact for enquiries: Ali Bramwell, phone (03) 479 0197

Southern Sinfonia - East Meets West

Southern Sinfonia's 2005 season is set to finish on a high note on when Conductor Ryusuke Numajiri joins the Orchestra in East meets West. Held in association with Naylor Love, the concert will be part of Dunedin's Festival of Japan. Appropriately the first half of the programme includes works by Japan and New Zealand's best-known composers Toru Takemitsu and Douglas Lilburn. Takemitsu is arguably the most influential of all contemporary Japanese composers, and was instrumental in introducing Eastern and Western audiences to the music and sounds of each other's cultures. How Slow the Wind, inspired by the verse of Emily Dickinson is renowned as "a work of extraordinary beauty and timbral warmth". Lilburn is the father figure of orchestral music in New Zealand and Symphony No.1 is one of his best-known works. Also included in the programme is New Zealand composer Larry Pruden's evocative Harbour Nocturne. The evening will conclude with a rousing performance of the choral and orchestral masterpiece Requiem by Mozart, featuring the 2005 Lexus Song Quest winner Madeleine Pierard, and the combined City of Dunedin Choir and Auckland Choral Society.

1 October 2005, 8.00pm

Dunedin Town Hall, Moray Place, Dunedin

Contact for enquiries: Katie Ellwood, phone (03) 477 5623 or email sinfonia@earthlight.co.nz

Regent Theatre - Legends Unleashed

Legends Unleashed features New Zealand’s international legends, Eddie Low, Suzanne Prentice and John Grenell combining their vast talents to perform their own songs together with the songs and music of international legends including Roy Orbison, Conway Twitty, Patsy Cline, Jim Reeves, Loretta Lynn and Ray Charles. Legends Unleashed follows the recent successful stage productions, Welcome to My World, the story of Jim Reeves, featuring John Grenell, Sweet Dreams, the story of Patsy Cline, featuring Suzanne Prentice and In Dreams, the story of Roy Orbison, featuring Eddie Low. Legends Unleashed will recreate the era of the American entertainment superstars listed above in a stage presentation created by the producers of Welcome to My World, In Dreams and Sweet Dreams. International musicians and back-up singers including Musical Director Davey Walker from Vancouver and Lead Guitarist Glen Bain from Sydney will accompany Eddie Low, Suzanne Prentice and John Grenell.

1 October 2005, 7.00pm

The Regent Theatre, 17 The Octagon, Dunedin

Contact for bookings and enquiries: Regent Theatre Ticketek, phone (03) 477 8597

Otago Museum

2005 Otago Wildlife Photographer of the Year Competition

Following the success of this competition for the last five consecutive years the Otago Museum, Natural History New Zealand, Jonathan's Camera & Video and Nikon have come together once again to bring this exciting photographic opportunity to the community of Otago. This impressive exhibition showcases the winners of the 2005 Otago Wildlife Photography Competition. The categories are Plant, Animal and Human Impact on the Natural Environment. These years' entrants have once again highlighted the outstanding calibre of amateur photographers in Otago. Don't miss your chance to see their wonderful photographs!

Runs until 2 October 2005

Nature Gallery

Japanese Contemporary Clay Work

This exhibition showcases the work of Japanese ceramic artists in this field. The distinctive, individualistic works on display are both essentially contemporary as well as reflective of age-old Japanese sensibilities.

Runs until 30 October 2005

People of the World Gallery

Kimono

2005 marks the 25th anniversary of Dunedin’s sister-city relationship with Otaru, Japan. Otago Museum is marking this anniversary with an exhibition of Japanese Kimono. This beautiful exhibition of traditional Japanese garments is bound to inspire.

Runs until 29 January 2006

Special Exhibitions Gallery

Shoji Hamada - Japanese Master Potter

Acknowledged as a leading figure in the revival of Japanese craft pottery, Hamada was of enormous influence on the ceramic arts worldwide. The recipient of numerous cultural honours in Japan, England and America, his visit to New Zealand in 1965 had a great impact on our own studio ceramics. The Otago Museum exhibition celebrates the 40th anniversary of Hamada’s visit to New Zealand. It will include examples of his work from the 1920s through to the 1960s, borrowed from New Zealand public institutions and private collectors for this purpose, as well as items from the Otago Museum collection.

Runs until 29 January 2006

Stairwell cases

Guided Tours

Take a ‘Highlights of the Museum’ guided tour and learn some inside knowledge about various aspects that the Museum has on offer and/or take a guided tour of ‘Southern Land, Southern People’ and gain a greater understanding, of the Southern region. ‘Highlights of the Museum’ guided tours are available at 11.30am and ‘Southern Land, Southern People’ guided tours are available at 3.30pm (and other times by prior arrangement).

Ongoing Service - 11.30am & 3.30pm daily

Lunchtime Music

A range of musicians will liven up the atrium with live performances each week. This is now a regular fixture but is subject to change according to function demands.

Museum Foyer, Fridays & Saturdays between 12 noon & 1.30pm

Discovery World Science Shows

These excellent shows are now run by the Museum’s Science Communicators.

Discovery World, Saturdays & Sundays at 11.00am, 1.00pm & 3.00pm

Gallery Talks

Each day, the Otago Museum Communicators present fascinating 15-minute gallery talks on objects or themes of particular interest from the Museum's galleries.

Ongoing Service, 2.00pm daily

Search Centre

Otago Museum’s Search Centre research facility provides an inviting opportunity for visitors to engage in further research on objects or themes in the galleries of interest to them. It will also be the first stop for the identification of items members of the public bring into the Museum, a service that annually attracts a huge number of objects or specimens. Well resourced, with swift new computers, microscopes, modern journals and a great variety of new books, the Search Centre offers a variety of options for seeking further information. Set in a comfortable and relaxing environment the Search Centre is the perfect place in which to think, read, study, or research.

Ongoing Service

Search Centre Weekend Presentations

The Museum’s Search Centre Communicators have developed a series of Search Centre Weekend Presentations designed to help familiarise people with the excellent resources provided by this facility.

Ongoing Service, Weekends at 11.30am & 2.30pm

Ongoing Exhibitions

The Museum’s timbered Victorian gallery, the Animal Attic, houses an extensive collection of natural history specimens from around the world, re-displayed as they would have been in the late 1800s. A ‘museum within a museum’, this gallery is unique in New Zealand. Explore the Tangata Whenua Gallery with its impressive displays of Maori Cultural artefacts, including a stunning collection of Southern Maori material. The Pacific Culture Galleries display outstanding collections from Polynesia and Melanesia. People of the World has world archaeological treasures including ancient Greek pottery; a mummy and other fascinating artefacts from Ancient Egypt; a striking collection of swords; exquisite decorative arts from Asia and Europe and a superb array of costume and textiles. Walk the length of the giant Fin Whale in the Maritime Gallery, and then take in the intricate detail of a wealth of nautical artefacts. Come face to face with the extinct giant moa in the Extinction and Survival area and see one of the few complete moa eggs in the world.

Otago Museum, 419 Great King Street, Dunedin

Contact for enquiries: Annabelle Boelema, phone (03) 474 7474 ext 845, www.otagomuseum.govt.nz

Milford Galleries Dunedin

Jon Tootill

Homes, New Zealand homes, are once again the subject of Jon Tootill's latest exhibition at Milford Galleries Dunedin. The former Saatchi and Saatchi creative director paints the houses we all grew up in - tidy bungalows set in suburbia. Colour themes dominate and the architectural quality of each of the houses is emphasised by the elimination of detail. These paintings could be part of building plans. It is a period of architecture some of us wish to forget: aluminium windows, concrete steps, box shapes. Easy, and cheap to build, these were the sixties and seventies answer to homes for families when builders designed homes and architects were to be avoided. This was how we colonised the countryside, fulfilled the New Zealand dream of home ownership and provided healthy, happy and safe environments for families. It was the New Zealand paradise we told ourselves - the quarter acre section - so much better than the housing estates of England and the United States, being built at the same time. Tootill was born in Hamilton in 1951 and, between 1970-1971, attended the Auckland Institute of Technology's School of Graphic Art. He has regularly exhibited in New Zealand since 1978 and won the Ida Eise Painting Award in 1988. He lives in Auckland and has been painting full time since 1998.

Runs until 5 October 2005

Scott McFarlane

The latest works by Scott McFarlane explore the overlap between intention and outcome, paint and illusion, the psychological and the physical. McFarlane paints about the memory of place as much as he paints to explore what paint can do and how that medium echoes the Otago landscapes that he describes. Within these new paintings there is a pleasing duality composed of Victorian nostalgia and earthy realism. This sensibility is captured by the emblematic treatment of landscapes that are heavy with timeless melancholy and stillness. It is captured by the controlled rawness of the paint application and the secondary colour palette, as if the artist has used the earth itself. The chiaroscuro or distance between darkest dark and lightest light is dramatic, and yet there is a calm and meditative quality to each of these paintings. The intensity and metaphysical beauty about the way McFarlane describes dark, light, and shape, suits these southern landscapes well. It resonates for many who know the gothic beauty of the southern contrasts and the soaring dominance of the landscape.

7 - 27 October 2005

Karl Maughan

Karl Maughan has come home. Back, living in Auckland, after just over a decade in London, Karl and family are enjoying New Zealand life. "It was something we always were going to do and in the end it was 'why wait, let's do it now,'" he says from his studio in Auckland. Not that he has severed all connections with the UK, being still very much in favour with the European art scene. He will return for commissions, exhibitions and other projects he is involved with. But his return to New Zealand will mean a shift in his subject matter. Known for his large paintings of English gardens, Maughan is now painting scenes from New Zealand gardens, preparing for a major exhibition with Milford Galleries Dunedin due to open in late October. Karl Maughan was born in Wellington in 1964. He gained a Bachelor of Fine Arts at Elam School of Fine Arts, University of Auckland in 1986 and a Masters of Fine Arts in 1987 and has exhibited regularly since then. From 1994 he was based in London and in 1997 was a finalist in the John Moore Painting Award. His work is held in public and private collections in New Zealand and the UK including the Saatchi Gallery in London. In 1998 his massive six-panel work 'A Clear Day' was installed in the Habitat store in Chelsea, London. The work was bought by Te Papa in 2000.

29 October - 17 November 2005

Milford Galleries Dunedin, 18 Dowling Street, Dunedin

Contact for enquiries: Karen Trebilcock, phone (03) 477 8275, email karen@milfordhouse.co.nz

Globe Theatre - Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare

Orsino loves Olivia, who loves Viola who loves Orsino. Confused? There's more in this production of Shakespeare's best-loved work, which is directed by Brian Beresford. Viola, who has disguised herself as a man, following the shipwreck that landed her on Orsino's alien shore, has an identical twin brother (Shakespeare didn't know about genetics) who has apparently been lost at sea during that same time but whose reappearance provides opportunities for even more confusion as he, unlike the disguised Viola, is far more responsive to Olivia's passionate advances.

6 - 15 October 2005 (excluding 10 October)

Globe Theatre, 104 London Street, Dunedin

Contact for bookings: Globe Theatre Box Office, phone (03) 4773274

Contact for enquiries: Rosemary Beresford, phone (03) 4797273 (day), (03) 4780248 (evening)

University of Otago - Lunchtime Theatre: Bite size Shows

Lunchtime Theatre is celebrating its thirty years innovation of Theatre Studies at the University of Otago and has been pleasing audiences ever since its conception. There are a huge variety of performance styles - from improvised theatre to naturalistic plays, to simply the most bizarre material encountered.

Even More Lucky Dip Theatre

Showcasing the talents of THEA 312: Directing 2 students. A different selection each day from playwrights around the world. Check posters, fliers and Critic for details, or just come along and have a lucky dip...

6 & 7 October 2005, 1.00pm

Collection

Four weeks, a stage and thousands of strange ways to communicate, cooperate and collide. A devised collaborative production between Allen Hall, his students and Wellington director Jade Eriksen.

13 & 14 October 2005, 1.00pm

Allen Hall Theatre, University of Otago, Union Street, Dunedin

Contact for enquiries: Fiona McLaughlin, phone (03) 479 8896

Fortune Theatre - Alarms and Excursions

This is the New Zealand Premiere of the play written by Michael Frayn and directed by Hilary Norris. Why does the photocopier hate you? A farceur of unparalleled skill, the write of "Noises Off" has created a comedy about the innumerable gadgets and vehicles of miscommunication plaguing our modern world. Cell phones, beepers, alarms and all manner of devices cause havoc in eight miniature plays beginning with a dinner party of disastrous proportions and building to a frenzied finale involving the world's politest German tourist, 11 separate pay phones and the answering machine from hell.

7 - 29 October 2005

Fortune Theatre, 231 Stuart Street, Dunedin

Contact for enquiries: Lisa Scott, phone (03) 477 1695

Contact for Bookings: Box Office, phone (03) 477 8323

Dunedin Public Art Gallery - Exhibitions

Rebecca Horn

Dunedin is the only New Zealand venue for this exhibition of sculptures, films and installations made by one of Germany’s leading contemporary artists.

8 October 2005 - 31 January 2006

Maryrose Crook: Bringing all the things that run

Bringing all the things that run is a suite of works by Dunedin painter and musician Maryrose Crook. The show includes evocative southern skyscapes, intricately detailed dresses, still lifes stocked with fragments of nineteenth century history, cabinets of curiosity, and some wry, haunting depictions of moths clothed in their own extraordinary patterns and insignia.

A Southland Museum and Art Gallery Touring Exhibition

Runs until 9 October 2005

Peter Robinson: VAP 2005/06

In the past two years, New Zealand artist Peter Robinson has merged the comic and monstrous in a series of impressive sculptures and ‘floorworks’. In this Visiting Artists Project, Robinson extends his grotesques even more energetically into three dimensions. Echoing the welded-steel sculptures of Anthony Caro and the brooding late paintings of Philip Guston, Robinson’s new creatures stretch out on steel limbs and entangle gallery-goers in the question of just what they are and do.

Supported by Creative NZ

15 October - 28 January 2006

Frances, France and the French

Frances, France and the French explores one thread in Frances Hodgkins' life in Europe. Through a selection of works made in France between 1901 and 1930, it identifies her favoured subjects - fishing villages, markets, landscapes and people - and suggests evolutions in her relationship with the country and its inhabitants.

A Dunedin Public Art Gallery exhibition

Runs until 30 October 2005

Richard Killeen: Nature, Culture

The foyer becomes a fishbowl in May, when Richard Killeen fills the Big Wall with a colossal, red, white and black fish. The latest in Killeen's recent run of hypnotically detailed computer-designed images, his fish wears a camouflage of vibrant punctuation marks.

Runs until 6 November 2005

Miyabi: Japanese Treasures from Dunedin Collections

The exhibition includes ceramics, netsuke and other small sculptural objects, armour and swords, textiles and woodblock prints.

Runs until February 2006

Sara Hughes: Love Me Tender

Sara Hughes brings colour and life to the Dunedin Public Art Gallery’s Otago Daily Times Gallery with her distinctive variations on the Paisley patterns that Scottish settlers brought to Dunedin. Cut from pre-painted sheets of sticky vinyl, Hughes’ Paisley shapes stretch and flex as if manipulated on a computer screen - nineteenth century forms refreshed by twenty-first century technology.

A Dunedin Public Art Gallery exhibition

Ongoing Exhibition

Dunedin Public Art Gallery, 30 The Octagon, PO Box 5045, Dunedin

Contact for Exhibition enquiries: Tim Pollock, phone (03) 474 3243

Contact for Visitor Programme enquiries: Robyn Notman, phone (03) 474 3258

New Zealand Symphony Orchestra - Lion Foundation Mainland Tour 2005

Visiting guest conductor Ramon Gamba presents a concert of great variety from the nostalgia of the opening Folk Songs and charm of Mozart’s concert - as performed by NZSO Principal Bassoonist Preman Tilson, fresh back from his performance at the World Expo in Aichi, Japan as part of the NZSO’s world Tour - to the fizzy exuberance of Mendelssohn’s Italian Symphony. There is also an appealing surprise in NZ composer Ross Harris’s Song for Jonny!

10 October 2005, 7.30pm

Dunedin Town Hall, Moray Place, Dunedin

Contact for bookings: Regent Theatre Ticketek, phone (03) 477 8597

Contact for enquiries: Hannah Evans, phone (04) 801 3833, 021 745 290, email hannahe@nzso.co.nz

Dunedin Centre

New Zealand Symphony Orchestra

Conducted by Rumon Gamba with Preman Tilson on Bassoon, the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra presents a programme including Britten’s Suite on English Folk Tunes, Mozart’s Bassoon Concerto, Weber’s Andante and Rondo ongarese, Ross Harris’ Music for Jonny and Mendelssohn’s Symphony No 4 Italian.

10 October 2005, 7.30pm

Dunedin Town Hall, Moray Place, Dunedin

Contact for enquiries: Regent Theatre Ticketek, phone (03) 477 8597

Contact for bookings: Regent Theatre Ticketek, phone (03) 477 8597

Tichman-Bieler-Kliegel Piano Trio

Tichman-Bieler-Kliegel Piano Trio present a programme including Beethoven’s Piano Trio in D, Opus 70 No 1 ‘The Ghost’, Ravel’s Piano Trio in A minor (1915), and Mendelssohn’s Piano Trio in C minor Opus 66. The Piano Trio is comprised of Nina Tichman on piano, Ida Bieler on violin and Maria Kliegal on cello. A graduate of the famous Julliard School, Nina Tichman (piano) has won many prestigious competitions and appears around the world as a soloist with orchestras and in recital. In 2004 Nina was invited to perform for the President of Germany. Ida Bieler (violin), for many years a member of the Melos Quartet, is in demand as a teacher and a judge at international master classes and competitions. Maria Kliegel is one of the leading cellists of the 21st Century. She plays the legendary “Ex Gendron” cello made by Stradivarius in 1693. For more than 30 years the cello was owned by Maurice Gendron and was loaned to Maria by the Foundation for the Arts and Culture of North Rhine Westphalia.

20 October 2005, 8.00pm

Glenroy Auditorium, 1 Harrop Street, Dunedin

Contact for enquiries: Regent Theatre Ticketek, phone (03) 477 8597

Contact for bookings: Regent Theatre Ticketek, phone (03) 477 8597

Cleveland Living Arts Centre

Cleveland Art Awards

Seeking to reflect the diversity of the art process selected works represent painting, photography, sculpture, textiles, ceramics and everything in between. Artists from throughout the South Island are represented and this year’s prize pool has increased to $10,500.

Runs until 23 October 2005

Fourth Annual Children’s Art Exhibition

Primary and Intermediate Children are invited to respond each year to a theme; this year it is “The many colours of nature: Celebrating the Environment”. Each item of work is accompanied by a short statement from each child.

31 October - 12 November 2005

Cleveland Living Arts Centre, First Floor, Dunedin Railway Station, Dunedin

Monday - Friday, 10.00am - 4.00pm; Saturday, 10.00am - 2.00pm

Contact for enquiries: Kari Morseth, phone (03) 477 7291

Dunedin Rhododendron Festival

The Dunedin Rhododendron Festival is an annual four-day celebration that has become a much-enjoyed part of the Dunedin spring calendar. 2005 marks the 22nd year of the Dunedin Rhododendron Festival and looks set to be an exciting event. The 2005 Dunedin Rhododendron Festival has a strong focus on garden tours with a variety of tours on offer. Please visit the website for more information www.rhododunedin.co.nz .

27 - 30 October 2005

Contact for enquiries: Victoria Bunton, phone (03) 474 5162

Dunedin Public Libraries Network

Film Screening: X-Force = The Science of Flight - A Natural History New Zealand Production

The Library is going to the Movies! X Force - The Science of Flight explores the science behind the adrenalin rush of this extreme discipline and follows the epic flight by New Zealand paragliding pilot Bryan Moore over the Southern Alps from Wanaka to the base of Mt. Cook, New Zealand’s highest mountain. Exploring the technical, physical and psychological demands of cutting-edge paragliding exploration, The Science of Flight captures the danger and exhilaration of flying high on a single nylon wing.

27 October 2005, 10.30am & 5.30pm

4th Floor, City Library, Moray Place, Dunedin

Discovery Tours

Take a free tour of the City Library every Tuesday and every last Saturday of the month.

Tuesdays, 10.30am and 1.00pm. Last Saturday of the month, 2.00pm.

Dunedin City Library, Moray Place, Dunedin

Stack Trek Tours

Go where few borrowers have gone before. Visit the City Library’s basement area and find those long lost “oldies but goodies” every last Saturday of the month.

Last Saturday of the month, 1.00pm

Dunedin City Library, Moray Place, Dunedin

Contact for enquiries: Liz Knowles, phone (03) 474 3317, email lknowles@dcc.govt.nz

Hocken Collections

The Medical Body
The Medical Body is an installation exploring the ways that the body has been used as a teaching tool at the Medical School, showcasing the anatomical paintings of John Halliday Scott (1877-1914) and glassware from the Department of Physiology. The exhibition is curated by Pennie Hunt with artists Ana Terry and Don Hunter.

Runs until 5 November 2005

Terminus

Terminus at the Hocken looks at networks, relationships and the effects of isolation, both positive and negative using the port as a focus for the inquiry. Iain Cheesman is using a playful moment of arrival that refers to both royal and alien visitations. Australian based Neil Berecry Brown works in a process oriented way and will be installing directly in the gallery using elements that relate to flux and play of ideas and people through a specific place like a working port, maybe also like a working preschool. Ali Bramwell also uses play and transport as a motif making reference to rail and road transport networks in a kitset way, a bureaucrat with a train set. All three have approached the project with an underlying humour and irreverence. Terminus at the Hocken is a gallery-based part of a larger project taking place in October, Terminus 2005 curated and directed by Ali Bramwell, which involves twenty plus artists from as far a field as Britain. The larger public art project is taking place in Nelson on Haulashore island and in Dunedin in and around the inner harbour. The three artists showing at the Hocken will also be making sited works at other locations. There is another Terminus linked exhibition on at the Blue Oyster Gallery during October

Runs until 5 November 2005

Hocken Collections, University of Otago, 90 Anzac Avenue, Dunedin

Weekdays 9.30am - 5.00pm, Saturdays 9.00am - 12.00pm

Contact for enquiries: Pennie Hunt, phone 479 5648

Otago Settlers Museum

Vikings in our Midst - Nordic Connections in Southern New Zealand

Connections have been forged between the people of the Nordic region and the people of southern New Zealand for more than 150 years. The story told in this exhibition begins with tales of Nordic sailors and gold seekers and with the arrival of an immigrant ship named Palmerston. Then in the 1920s and 1930s it was visits by a fleet of Norwegian whaling ships hunting in the icy waters of the Southern Ocean that added to our connectedness. The post-World War Two era brought further Nordic migrants and today the connections continue to be fostered, thanks in part to a thriving community of Scandinavian students. There are indeed Vikings in our Midst.

Runs until 13 November 2005

Dunedin’s War: The wartime experiences of Dunedin people 1939-1945

On 15 August 1945 the greatest armed conflict in history finally came to an end. For six long years the world had been convulsed by war. Tens of millions of people had died. Vast areas were devastated, entire countries in ruins. It might seem that Dunedin was far away from the battlefields. This exhibition is a tribute to the wartime generation whose ranks are now thinning, It commemorates especially over 900 Dunedin citizens who went to war but never returned. “They gave their tomorrow to give us our today”.

Runs until 17 February 2006

Across the Ocean Waves

What was it like crossing the oceans to come here in a sailing ship? The core of this new display is an accurate recreation of the steerage quarters of an immigrant ship bound for Otago in the days of sail. Visitors are welcome to climb into a bunk or sit at the central table and imagine what life would have been like cooped up for 100 or more days at sea. Short video presentations bring the era to life. Death and disaster, fun and romance, the misery of seasickness and the excitement of arrival are all showcased. A baby dies, fighting breaks out among the single girls, and there is dancing and a stolen kisses. This is an interactive exhibit, which will seize the imagination and transport you back to the epic voyages made by Otago’s nineteenth century ancestors. Participants can climb aboard and see for themselves what the great migration was all about.

Ongoing Exhibition

Appliance Emporium: Housekeeping Made Easy

Whenever you start to grumble about doing the chores, spare a thought for how housekeeping was conducted in the old days. There were no washing machines to load, set and forget. No one-touch microwave cooking. Ironing likewise was a dreaded chore that involved hours of intensive effort. This exhibition takes a look at some of the housekeeping devices used by Victorian housekeepers and the introduction in the mid-twentieth century of some of those labour-saving devices we now take for granted.

An Otago Settlers Museum exhibition

Ongoing Exhibition

On the Move: Road Transport in Otago

One hundred years ago Thomas Sullivan invented the tea bag, Charles Menches invented the ice cream cone and vehicles were becoming increasingly familiar sights on Dunedin streets. To find out more about local motoring and transportation milestones check out On the Move: Road Transport in Otago - an exhibition of vehicles, photographs and memorabilia recalling not only the dawn of motoring in Otago but also the heydays of horse-drawn coaches and drays, tramcars and cycles. Be sure not to miss a ride on the penny-farthing.

Ongoing Exhibition

The Smith Gallery

The Otago Early Settlers Museum opened in 1908 with just one room for displays. Now known as the Smith Gallery, it was a memorial to Otago’s Scottish pioneers. Stern Presbyterian faces glowered down from rows of photographic portraits amidst artefacts of daily life from Otago’s early days. Today, the Smith Gallery emphasises the importance of the Early Settlers in the story of Otago. The portraits on the walls have been rearranged in order of arrival; and a variety of furniture and other artefacts, all drawn from the pre- gold rush era, add character to this historic gallery.

Ongoing Exhibition

Otago Settlers Museum - Visitor Programmes

Walk The Inner City

An experienced guide will takes visitors on a 90-minute stroll while experiencing the character, history and beauty of Dunedin, New Zealand’s first great city. Enjoy this wonderful insight into Dunedin’s architectural and social past.

Ongoing Service, 11.00am weekdays

Visitor Information Centre, The Octagon, Dunedin

Introductory Tours of the Museum

Experience a guided tour of the Otago Settlers Museum. Each tour lasts approximately 30 minutes.

Ongoing Service, 11.00am weekdays (except public holidays)

Otago Settlers Museum, 31 Queens Gardens, Dunedin

Contact for Exhibition enquiries: Tim Pollock, phone (03) 474 3242

Contact for Visitor Programme enquiries: Robyn Notman, phone (03) 474 3258

November 2005

Cleveland Living Arts Centre

Spinners and Weavers of New Zealand

New Zealand spinners and weavers show case their talent in this touring exhibition.

1 - 12 November 2005

Continuum

Satoko and Motoko Watanabe are mother and daughter, both trained in Japan. Satoko's painting is inseparable from her interest in children's art, which makes her aware of life's depth and the mystery that exists before words are formed. Her daughter Motoko, has lived in New Zealand since 2000 and works in pastels, which she says have a similar effect to traditional Japanese "rock paint". Both are happy to be part of the continuum - of generations, tradition, relationships and life.

8 - 19 November 2005

Fourth Annual Children’s Art Exhibition

Primary and Intermediate Children are invited to respond each year to a theme; this year it is “The many colours of nature: Celebrating the Environment”. A short statement accompanies each item of work from each child.

Runs until 12 November 2005

Kings Adult Art Students

A popular group show demonstrating the achievements of students from the full time art course. Tutors of the group include print maker Inge Doesburg.

16 - 26 November 2005

Lynette Robb

An exhibition of recent paintings from Cantabrian artist Lynette Robb features with each room containing a related series of paintings.

22 - 27 November 2005

Cleveland Living Arts Centre, First Floor, Dunedin Railway Station, Dunedin.

Monday - Friday, 10.00am - 4.00pm; Saturday, 10.00am - 2.00pm

Contact for enquiries: Kari Morseth, phone (03) 477 7291

Dunedin Public Libraries Network

Discovery Tours

Take a free tour of the City Library every Tuesday and every last Saturday of the month.

Ongoing Service - Tuesdays, 10.30am & 1.00pm; Last Saturday of the month, 2.00pm.

Dunedin City Library, Moray Place, Dunedin

Stack Trek Tours

Go where few borrowers have gone before. Visit the City Library’s basement area and find those long lost “oldies but goodies” every last Saturday of the month.

Ongoing Service - Last Saturday of the month, 1.00 pm

Dunedin City Library, Moray Place, Dunedin

Contact for enquiries: Liz Knowles, phone (03) 474 3317, email lknowles@dcc.govt.nz

Fortune Theatre - Spreading Out

It is 25 years on and we revisit the characters of Roger Hall's enormously successful "Middle Age Spread". Colin and Elizabeth, now retired, proudly survey their Central Otago vineyard from imported Javanese deckchairs. Sipping their pinot noir as the sun sets, the serenity is only marred by the gentle snores of their lay-about son. With their daughter and granddaughter arriving to celebrate the New Year, gatecrashers in the form of old neighbours Reg and Isobel (in their gaudy mobile home) look to ruin all best-laid plans and rout any noble new year's resolutions. A comedy of bad manners, unexpected revelations and marital discord oh goody!

4 November to 3 December 2005

Fortune Theatre, 231 Stuart Street, Dunedin

Contact for enquiries: Lisa Scott, phone (03) 477 1695

Contact for Bookings: Box Office, phone (03) 477 8323

Hocken Collections

The Medical Body
The Medical Body is an installation exploring the ways that the body has been used as a teaching tool at the Medical School, showcasing the anatomical paintings of John Halliday Scott (1877-1914) and glassware from the Department of Physiology. The exhibition is curated by Pennie Hunt with artists Ana Terry and Don Hunter.

Runs until 5 November 2005

Terminus

Terminus at the Hocken looks at networks, relationships and the effects of isolation, both positive and negative using the port as a focus for the inquiry. Iain Cheesman is using a playful moment of arrival that refers to both royal and alien visitations. Australian based Neil Berecry Brown works in a process oriented way and will be installing directly in the gallery using elements that relate to flux and play of ideas and people through a specific place like a working port, maybe also like a working preschool. Ali Bramwell also uses play and transport as a motif making reference to rail and road transport networks in a kitset way, a bureaucrat with a train set. All three have approached the project with an underlying humour and irreverence. Terminus at the Hocken is a gallery-based part of a larger project taking place in October, Terminus 2005 curated and directed by Ali Bramwell, which involves twenty plus artists from as far a field as Britain. The larger public art project is taking place in Nelson on Haulashore island and in Dunedin in and around the inner harbour. The three artists showing at the Hocken will also be making sited works at other locations. There is another Terminus linked exhibition on at the Blue Oyster Gallery during October

Runs until 5 November 2005

Design History
A Design History exhibition curated by Design Studies students at the University of Otago.

12 November 2005 - 14 January 2006

Hocken Collections, University of Otago, 90 Anzac Avenue, Dunedin

Weekdays 9.30am - 5.00pm, Saturdays 9.00am - 12.00pm

Contact for enquiries: Pennie Hunt, phone 479 5648

Dunedin Public Art Gallery - Exhibitions

Richard Killeen: Nature, Culture

The foyer becomes a fishbowl in May, when Richard Killeen fills the Big Wall with a colossal, red, white and black fish. The latest in Killeen's recent run of hypnotically detailed computer-designed images, his fish wears a camouflage of vibrant punctuation marks.

Runs until 6 November 2005

Rebecca Horn

Dunedin is the only New Zealand venue for this exhibition of sculptures, films and installations made by one of Germany’s leading contemporary artists.

Runs until 31 January 2006

Miyabi: Japanese Treasures from Dunedin Collections

The exhibition includes ceramics, netsuke and other small sculptural objects, armour and swords, textiles and woodblock prints.

Runs until February 2006

Sara Hughes: Love Me Tender

Sara Hughes brings colour and life to the Dunedin Public Art Gallery’s Otago Daily Times Gallery with her distinctive variations on the Paisley patterns that Scottish settlers brought to Dunedin. Cut from pre-painted sheets of sticky vinyl, Hughes’ Paisley shapes stretch and flex as if manipulated on a computer screen - nineteenth century forms refreshed by twenty-first century technology.

A Dunedin Public Art Gallery exhibition

Ongoing Exhibition

Dunedin Public Art Gallery, 30 The Octagon, PO Box 5045, Dunedin

Contact for Exhibition enquiries: Tim Pollock, phone (03) 474 3243

Contact for Visitor Programme enquiries: Robyn Notman, phone (03) 474 3258

Regent Theatre - The Royal New Zealand Ballet - The Nutcracker

Featuring the Southern Sinfonia the Nutcracker is just what the doctor ordered. Whirling snow imps and tangoing tea ladies join the ever-enchanting Sugar Plum Fairy in a festive treat for all the family. Choreographers Gary Harris and Adam Burnett spin a dreamy confection of classical dance to Tchaikovsky’s sumptuous score. Kristian Fredrikson’s design is a Technicolor vision straight out of Hollywood’s big studio era.

12 November 2005, 7.30pm and 13 November 2005, 2.30pm

Regent Theatre, 17 The Octagon, Dunedin

Contact for enquiries: Regent Theatre Ticketek, phone (03) 477 8597

Contact for bookings: Regent Theatre Ticketek, phone (03) 477 8597

Blue Oyster

Jenny Gillam - In Dark Trees / August Moon

Wellington based Jenny Gillam displays work from an ongoing series developing a photographic investigation of post-colonial New Zealand. The work draws on cinematic aesthetics appropriated from the golden age of Hollywood and science fiction both contemporary and retro. The science fiction sources introduce an undercurrent of anxiety, a sensation of post apocalyptic shift away from New Zealand kitsch to something Gillam describes as ‘antipodean gothic.’ In this project wild New Zealand landscapes replace inherited European gothic iconography from traditions of psychological horror. Nature becomes an uncanny representation as a force beyond human control where a violent and repressed past returns to haunt the present.

Runs until 12 November 2005

Blue Oyster Upper Gallery

Andreas Pytlik - Green for NZ, Watching the Sea

German sculptor Andreas Pytlik uses the colour green as a vehicle for his ideas, which are located somewhere in a minimalist practice that is phenomenologically concerned… Or more clearly that he is interested in the associative power of a ‘simple’ unifying element such as a colour. His work takes the form of time based and social interactions as well as more traditionally defined static art gestures such as sculpture or painting. In all of his work he uses the colour as a place of transaction, where his respondent negotiates their own ground within the work. For Green for NZ, Watching the Sea Pytlik proposes to link two sites, the harbour and the gallery with an installation. He talks about changing an everyday item a few degrees by changing its colour. The item is a small dingy and the colour of course is green. The boat is the centre of the exhibition and combined with the other elements of the project brings another place-ness and refers to the idea of travel. Viewers are invitation to look out at different vistas and are offered the means to go there.

Runs until 12 November 2005

Blue Oyster Lower Gallery

Paul Cullen - The Unreliability of Gravity

Paul Cullen’s project for Blue Oyster has the working title, The Unreliability of Gravity, and represents a continuation of his ongoing inquiries. Cullen sees this current project as a model or diagram of the gallery as an impossible place where gravity is suspended. Fundamentally his works are like propositions, involving a kind of testing out of ideas where the process of asking questions is more important than locating answers. These propositional investigations involve a testing (possibly) of objective knowledge through the various means we employ to construct, arrange and organise the physical world. As in his recent ‘antigravity projects’ the installation will be located, in part at least, on the gallery ceiling and supported by a scaffold-like structure. The installation may include rotating world globes, altered scale versions of architectural models made from cardboard, tape, items of partially dismantled furniture, ordinary objects, models/elements reconstructed from previous temporary ‘antigravity’ installations and amateur light fittings. Filling a room with such objects, pressed high up against the ceiling, provides a prosaic - and absurd - alternative means of achieving "anti-gravity". Cullen’s constructions often strive towards pseudo-laboratory scenarios employing a varied cast of items and staged processes with which to make up his 'experimental' situations.

15 November - 3 December 2005

Blue Oyster Upper Gallery

Diane Halstead

Diane Halstead began a project at the Blue Oyster in 2003 called Mulatto - Bloodlines that explored her hybrid identity as a New Zealander with mixed ethnicity. This new work proposes to again use her own hybrid heritage as a starting point but engages more specifically with the absences and lacunae in her personal history. The project is a photographic record of a search for identity clues, recording fragments that might tell her something about who she is. She has begun with a tactile and practical way that women have of holding on to history, through textiles. The ‘clues’ that she has begun photographing are brightly coloured patterns and prints, literally closely observing and photographing crudely repaired tears in the almost aggressively coloured fabrics. Halstead discusses polarities, talking about scarring and healing, horror and carnival. She is deliberately playing out a marked ambiguity of feeling by focussing on ruptures where she has torn the pattern herself and then attempted a repair. She presents the following quote from Homi K. Bhaba (1992) “This conflict of pleasure/unpleasure, mastery/defense, knowledge/disavowal, absence/presence, has a fundamental significance for colonial discourse.” The project proposal is presented as an active exploration that the artist expects will reflect the conflicts within the process of searching more accurately than it can present any newly found identity.

15 November - 3 December 2005

Blue Oyster Lower Gallery

Blue Oyster Gallery, Basement, Moray Chambers, 30 Moray Place, Dunedin

Contact for enquiries: Ali Bramwell, phone (03) 479 0197

Otago Settlers Museum

Vikings in our Midst - Nordic Connections in Southern New Zealand

Connections have been forged between the people of the Nordic region and the people of southern New Zealand for more than 150 years. The story told in this exhibition begins with tales of Nordic sailors and gold seekers and with the arrival of an immigrant ship named Palmerston. Then in the 1920s and 1930s it was visits by a fleet of Norwegian whaling ships hunting in the icy waters of the Southern Ocean that added to our connectedness. The post-World War Two era brought further Nordic migrants and today the connections continue to be fostered, thanks in part to a thriving community of Scandinavian students. There are indeed Vikings in our Midst.

Runs until 13 November 2005

Dunedin’s War: The wartime experiences of Dunedin people 1939-1945

On 15 August 1945 the greatest armed conflict in history finally came to an end. For six long years the world had been convulsed by war. Tens of millions of people had died. Vast areas were devastated, entire countries in ruins. It might seem that Dunedin was far away from the battlefields. This exhibition is a tribute to the wartime generation whose ranks are now thinning, It commemorates especially over 900 Dunedin citizens who went to war but never returned. “They gave their tomorrow to give us our today”.

Runs until 17 February 2006

Across the Ocean Waves

What was it like crossing the oceans to come here in a sailing ship? The core of this new display is an accurate recreation of the steerage quarters of an immigrant ship bound for Otago in the days of sail. Visitors are welcome to climb into a bunk or sit at the central table and imagine what life would have been like cooped up for 100 or more days at sea. Short video presentations bring the era to life. Death and disaster, fun and romance, the misery of seasickness and the excitement of arrival are all showcased. A baby dies, fighting breaks out among the single girls, and there is dancing and a stolen kisses. This is an interactive exhibit, which will seize the imagination and transport you back to the epic voyages made by Otago’s nineteenth century ancestors. Participants can climb aboard and see for themselves what the great migration was all about.

Ongoing Exhibition

Appliance Emporium: Housekeeping Made Easy

Whenever you start to grumble about doing the chores, spare a thought for how housekeeping was conducted in the old days. There were no washing machines to load, set and forget. No one-touch microwave cooking. Ironing likewise was a dreaded chore that involved hours of intensive effort. This exhibition takes a look at some of the housekeeping devices used by Victorian housekeepers and the introduction in the mid-twentieth century of some of those labour-saving devices we now take for granted.

An Otago Settlers Museum exhibition

Ongoing Exhibition

On the Move: Road Transport in Otago

One hundred years ago Thomas Sullivan invented the tea bag, Charles Menches invented the ice cream cone and vehicles were becoming increasingly familiar sights on Dunedin streets. To find out more about local motoring and transportation milestones check out On the Move: Road Transport in Otago - an exhibition of vehicles, photographs and memorabilia recalling not only the dawn of motoring in Otago but also the heydays of horse-drawn coaches and drays, tramcars and cycles. Be sure not to miss a ride on the penny-farthing.

Ongoing Exhibition

The Smith Gallery

The Otago Early Settlers Museum opened in 1908 with just one room for displays. Now known as the Smith Gallery, it was a memorial to Otago’s Scottish pioneers. Stern Presbyterian faces glowered down from rows of photographic portraits amidst artefacts of daily life from Otago’s early days. Today, the Smith Gallery emphasises the importance of the Early Settlers in the story of Otago. The portraits on the walls have been rearranged in order of arrival; and a variety of furniture and other artefacts, all drawn from the pre- gold rush era, add character to this historic gallery.

Ongoing Exhibition

Otago Settlers Museum - Visitor Programmes

Walk The Inner City

An experienced guide will takes visitors on a 90-minute stroll while experiencing the character, history and beauty of Dunedin, New Zealand’s first great city. Enjoy this wonderful insight into Dunedin’s architectural and social past.

Ongoing Service, 11.00am weekdays

Visitor Information Centre, The Octagon, Dunedin

Introductory Tours of the Museum

Experience a guided tour of the Otago Settlers Museum. Each tour lasts approximately 30 minutes.

Ongoing Service, 11.00am weekdays (except public holidays)

Otago Settlers Museum, 31 Queens Gardens, Dunedin

Contact for Exhibition enquiries: Tim Pollock, phone (03) 474 3242

Contact for Visitor Programme enquiries: Robyn Notman, phone (03) 474 3258

Milford Galleries Dunedin

Karl Maughan

Karl Maughan has come home. Back, living in Auckland, after just over a decade in London, Karl and family are enjoying New Zealand life. "It was something we always were going to do and in the end it was 'why wait, let's do it now,'" he says from his studio in Auckland. Not that he has severed all connections with the UK, being still very much in favour with the European art scene. He will return for commissions, exhibitions and other projects he is involved with. But his return to New Zealand will mean a shift in his subject matter. Known for his large paintings of English gardens, Maughan is now painting scenes from New Zealand gardens, preparing for a major exhibition with Milford Galleries Dunedin due to open in late October. Karl Maughan was born in Wellington in 1964. He gained a Bachelor of Fine Arts at Elam School of Fine Arts, University of Auckland in 1986 and a Masters of Fine Arts in 1987 and has exhibited regularly since then. From 1994 he was based in London and in 1997 was a finalist in the John Moore Painting Award. His work is held in public and private collections in New Zealand and the UK including the Saatchi Gallery in London. In 1998 his massive six-panel work 'A Clear Day' was installed in the Habitat store in Chelsea, London. Te Papa bought the work in 2000.

Runs until 16 November 2005

Neil Dawson

Neil Dawson has established an international reputation for his innovative large-scale sculpture. In New Zealand he is most well known for his work Ferns, installed in Wellington's Civic Square in 1998 and Chalice, an 18m-high conical structure installed in Christchurch's Cathedral Square in 2001. His 16.5 metre high sculpture at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra, to the Australians who served in Bomber Command in the Second World War, was recently dedicated. In his exhibition at Milford Galleries Dunedin there will be wall sculptures, which will be landscape forms with architectural elements. Dawson was born in Christchurch in 1948 where he still lives. He holds a Diploma of Fine Arts (Hons) from Canterbury University and a Graduate Diploma in Sculpture from Victorian College of the Arts in Melbourne.

18 November - 7 December 2005

Milford Galleries Dunedin, 18 Dowling Street, Dunedin

Contact for enquiries: Karen Trebilcock, phone (03) 477 8275, email karen@milfordhouse.co.nz

Otago Museum

Kimono

2005 marks the 25th anniversary of Dunedin’s sister-city relationship with Otaru, Japan. Otago Museum is marking this anniversary with an exhibition of Japanese Kimono. This beautiful exhibition of traditional Japanese garments is bound to inspire.

Runs until 29 January 2006

Special Exhibitions Gallery

Shoji Hamada - Japanese Master Potter

Acknowledged as a leading figure in the revival of Japanese craft pottery, Hamada was of enormous influence on the ceramic arts worldwide. The recipient of numerous cultural honours in Japan, England and America, his visit to New Zealand in 1965 had a great impact on our own studio ceramics. The Otago Museum exhibition celebrates the 40th anniversary of Hamada’s visit to New Zealand. It will include examples of his work from the 1920s through to the 1960s, borrowed from New Zealand public institutions and private collectors for this purpose, as well as items from the Otago Museum collection.

Runs until 29 January 2006

Stairwell cases

Guided Tours

Take a ‘Highlights of the Museum’ guided tour and learn some inside knowledge about various aspects that the Museum has on offer and/or take a guided tour of ‘Southern Land, Southern People’ and gain a greater understanding, of the Southern region. ‘Highlights of the Museum’ guided tours are available at 11.30am and ‘Southern Land, Southern People’ guided tours are available at 3.30pm (and other times by prior arrangement).

Ongoing Service - 11.30am & 3.30pm daily

Lunchtime Music

A range of musicians will liven up the atrium with live performances each week. This is now a regular fixture but is subject to change according to function demands.

Museum Foyer, Fridays & Saturdays between 12 noon & 1.30pm

Discovery World Science Shows

These excellent shows are now run by the Museum’s Science Communicators.

Discovery World, Saturdays & Sundays at 11.00am, 1.00pm & 3.00pm

Gallery Talks

Each day, the Otago Museum Communicators present fascinating 15-minute gallery talks on objects or themes of particular interest from the Museum's galleries.

Ongoing Service, 2.00pm daily

Search Centre

Otago Museum’s Search Centre research facility provides an inviting opportunity for visitors to engage in further research on objects or themes in the galleries of interest to them. It will also be the first stop for the identification of items members of the public bring into the Museum, a service that annually attracts a huge number of objects or specimens. Well resourced, with swift new computers, microscopes, modern journals and a great variety of new books, the Search Centre offers a variety of options for seeking further information. Set in a comfortable and relaxing environment the Search Centre is the perfect place in which to think, read, study, or research.

Ongoing Service

Search Centre Weekend Presentations

The Museum’s Search Centre Communicators have developed a series of Search Centre Weekend Presentations designed to help familiarise people with the excellent resources provided by this facility.

Ongoing Service, Weekends at 11.30am & 2.30pm

Ongoing Exhibitions

The Museum’s timbered Victorian gallery, the Animal Attic, houses an extensive collection of natural history specimens from around the world, re-displayed as they would have been in the late 1800s. A ‘museum within a museum’, this gallery is unique in New Zealand. Explore the Tangata Whenua Gallery with its impressive displays of Maori Cultural artefacts, including a stunning collection of Southern Maori material. The Pacific Culture Galleries display outstanding collections from Polynesia and Melanesia. People of the World has world archaeological treasures including ancient Greek pottery; a mummy and other fascinating artefacts from Ancient Egypt; a striking collection of swords; exquisite decorative arts from Asia and Europe and a superb array of costume and textiles. Walk the length of the giant Fin Whale in the Maritime Gallery, and then take in the intricate detail of a wealth of nautical artefacts. Come face to face with the extinct giant moa in the Extinction and Survival area and see one of the few complete moa eggs in the world.

Otago Museum, 419 Great King Street, Dunedin

Contact for enquiries: Annabelle Boelema, phone (03) 474 7474 ext 845, www.otagomuseum.govt.nz

- End -

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