Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Weavers to Gather in Waitara, Taranaki

12 October 2005

Weavers to Gather in Waitara, Taranaki

Labour Weekend (21 – 24 October) will see over 200 weavers gathering in Waitara, Taranaki to celebrate the art of Maori weaving, at the Weavers National Hui - a Toi Maori Aotearoa event held every two years.

Weavers; young and old, students, well known artists and respected elders will gather together to demonstrate their skills and learn from each other. The finest works of weaving will be on display and a Public Open Day will be held on Saturday 22 October at Owae Marae providing an opportunity for visitors to see the weavers at work and talk to them about their art.

A number of weavers have just returned from the USA with the major international touring exhibition "Toi Maori - The Eternal Thread." A delegation of 8 Maori weavers travelled to San Francisco, California for the 'Maori Art Meets America' event in August 2005. Another delegation travelled to Salem, Oregon to open the exhibition on 23 September at its second US venue, the Hallie Ford Museum of Art in Salem, Oregon, USA.

Two Native American weavers from Oregon, USA will attend the Hui to meet with Maori weavers. Bud Lane and Robert Kentta, both weavers, artists, and tribal council members will travel to Aotearoa to meet with Maori weavers. Agnes Baker-Pilgrim, revered Siletz tribal elder, and one of the members of the International Council of 13 Indigenous Grandmothers will also be an honoured guest.

Ranui Ngarimu, Chairperson of Te Roopu Raranga Whatu o Aotearoa (Weavers New Zealand) says that Maori weaving holds a critical position within the cultural landscape of Aotearoa.

“Our exhibition ‘The Eternal Thread – Te Aho Mutunga Kore’ has forged a new direction for us to present not only in our own country but also on the world stage. As weavers, we inherit a huge responsibility in continuing the known forms, exploring new directions and displaying the inherent beauty of our chosen art.”

The Weavers National Hui is presented by Toi Maori Aotearoa - Maori Arts New Zealand, the national organisation for Maori art. The Weavers National Hui and Toi Maori Aotearoa receive major funding from Te Waka Toi, the Maori Arts Board of Creative New Zealand. The Weavers National Hui is also supported by Auahi Kore and TSB Community Trust.

ENDS


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Max Rashbrooke: Review - The NZSO And Nature

This was a lovely, varied concert with an obvious theme based on the natural world. It kicked off with Mendelssohn's sparkling Hebrides Overture, which had a wonderfully taut spring right from the start, and great colour from the woodwinds, especially the clarinets. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news