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WAKA HUIA Docos Return From Wednesday January 25

WAKA HUIA Documentaries Return From Wednesday January 25

Maori Television revisits moments in Maori history with the channel’s first-time screening of archival WAKA HUIA documentaries from next Wednesday January 25 at 8.30 PM.

Broadcast for the first time on Maori Television, the documentaries hark back to iconic Maori issues and personalities that shaped the current direction of Maoridom in the channel’s Te Koputu Taonga (archival treasures) slot from 8.30 PM each Wednesday.

They include:

HIRINI MELBOURNE

Wednesday January 25 at 8.30 PM

In the third series’ first episode, viewers catch a rare profile of the late Dr Hirini Melbourne (Tuhoe, Ngati Kahungunu). Dr Melbourne was an instrumental part in shaping the direction of traditional Maori music and school of thought up to his passing in 2003.


HIRUHARAMA

Wednesday February 1 at 8.30 PM

Presenter Hone Kaa takes viewers on a journey to the historic Whanganui River settlement of Hiruharama.

MATAATUA

Wednesday February 8 at 8.30 PM

Featuring historical moment in waka taua (war canoe) history is commemorated in a documentary filmed at the launch of the waka, Mataatua Puhi.

MIRA SZASZY

Wednesday February 15 at 8.30 PM

The flower of the far north’s Muriwhenua iwi, the late Dame Miraka Szaszy, is remembered for her beauty and tenacity through an interview-based documentary with presenter Kingi Ihaka.

MOKI

Wednesday February 22 at 8.30 PM

Kaumatua Ned Waititi and Hohua Waititi (Te Whanau o Kauaetangohia) relay the fishing traditions of Te Whanau a Apanui in the eastern Bay of Plenty and the tribe’s intrinsic relationship with the moki fish

MOKOMOKO

Wednesday March 1 and Wednesday March 8 at 8.30 PM

“Tangohia mai te taura i taku kakii kia waiata au i taku waiata – Take the rope from my neck that I may sing my song”. These are words immortalised by the great Te Whakatohea leader Mokomoko in a two-part feature, Mokomoko.

NGAPO

Wednesday March 15 at 8.30 PM

The successful kapa haka group Waka Huia and its founders, Ngapo and Pimia Wehi, take the spotlight on this week’s episode.


Full Promos Of Episodes Follow:

Waka Huia: Hirini Melbourne

Maori Television revisits moments in Maori history with the channel’s first-time screening of archival WAKA HUIA documentaries from Wednesday January 25 at 8.30 PM.

Broadcast for the first time on Maori Television, the documentaries hark back to iconic Maori issues and personalities that shaped the current direction of Maoridom in the channel’s Te Koputu Taonga (archival treasures) slot from 8.30 PM each Wednesday.

Acquired from Television New Zealand archives, the series screens in the Maori language with English language sub titles for the benefit of all viewers.

WAKA HUIA was first transmitted in 1987 and has since captured over 500 hours of rare footage with esteemed Maori leaders and ventured into marae throughout the country, while revealing Maoridom’s brightest and most contentious moments.

In the third series’ first episode, Hirini Melbourne, viewers catch a rare profile of the late Dr Hirini Melbourne (Tuhoe, Ngati Kahungunu). Dr Melbourne was an instrumental part in shaping the direction of traditional Maori music and school of thought up to his passing in 2003.

A devotee of the Maori language, culture and music, Dr Melbourne led the renaissance of traditional Maori music and produced over 20 music recordings. He inspired a generation of Maori musicians with his works, produced in conjunction with Richard Munns, and his self-styled revival of traditional Maori instruments.

Dr Melbourne was also a respected scholar in his capacity as dean and associate professor at the University of Waikato’s School of Maori and Pacific Development and member of both the New Zealand Film Commission and the New Zealand Music Commission.

The episode, presented by Hemana Waaka, visits with Dr Melbourne in the studio as he speaks of his influences and career and performs music from his extensive repertoire.

In further episodes, the series will showcase the historic Whanganui River village of Hiruharama (Hiruharama: Wed Feb 1), the launch of the Mataatua Puhi canoe (Mataatua: Wed Feb 8), the late Dame Miraka Szaszy (Mira Szaszy: Wed Feb 15), the fishing traditions of Te Whanau a Apanui (Moki: Wed Feb 22), the descendants of Te Whakatohea ancestor Mokomoko (Mokomoko: Wed Mar 1 and Wed Mar 8), the formation of kapa haka (haka group) extraordinaire Waka Huia (Ngapo: Wed Mar 15) and more.

Unearth archival Maori treasures, with English language sub titles, with the launch of the new series of WAKA HUIA in the Te Koputu Taonga slot from Wednesday January 25 at 8.30 PM.

Ends

Waka Huia: Hiruharama

Maori Television revisits moments in Maori history with the channel’s first-time screening of archival WAKA HUIA documentaries each Wednesday at 8.30 PM.

Broadcast for the first time on Maori Television, the documentaries hark back to iconic Maori issues and personalities that shaped the current direction of Maoridom in the channel’s Te Koputu Taonga (archival treasures) slot from 8.30 PM each Wednesday.

Acquired from Television New Zealand archives, the series screens in the Maori language with English language sub titles for the benefit of all viewers.

WAKA HUIA was first transmitted in 1987 and has since captured over 500 hours of rare footage with esteemed Maori leaders and ventured into marae throughout the country, while revealing Maoridom’s brightest and most contentious moments.

On Wednesday February 1, presenter Hone Kaa takes viewers on a journey to the historic Whanganui River settlement of Hiruharama.

Through interviews with late kuia Wehe Wallace and Aggie Ngohona, the programme recalls stories from the Patiarero pa site which was originally the largest village on the river and located in the middle of a thriving water highway.

Hiruharama – or Jerusalem – is a short distance from Moutoa Island, which was the site of the battle of 1864. It is also the site of the Catholic Mission of the Sisters of Compassion, established in 1892.

In further episodes, the series will showcase the launch of the Mataatua Puhi canoe (Mataatua: Wed Feb 8), the late Dame Miraka Szaszy (Mira Szaszy: Wed Feb 15), the fishing traditions of Te Whanau a Apanui (Moki: Wed Feb 22), the descendants of Te Whakatohea ancestor Mokomoko (Mokomoko: Wed Mar 1 and Wed Mar 8), the formation of kapa haka (haka group) extraordinaire Waka Huia (Ngapo: Wed Mar 15) and more.

Unearth archival Maori treasures, with English language sub titles, on WAKA HUIA in the Te Koputu Taonga slot each Wednesday at 8.30 PM.

Ends

Waka Huia: Mataatua

Maori Television revisits moments in Maori history with the channel’s first-time screening of archival WAKA HUIA documentaries each Wednesday at 8.30 PM.

Broadcast for the first time on Maori Television, the documentaries hark back to iconic Maori issues and personalities that shaped the current direction of Maoridom in the channel’s Te Koputu Taonga (archival treasures) slot from 8.30 PM each Wednesday.

Acquired from Television New Zealand archives, the series screens in the Maori language with English language sub titles for the benefit of all viewers.

WAKA HUIA was first transmitted in 1987 and has since captured over 500 hours of rare footage with esteemed Maori leaders and ventured into marae throughout the country, while revealing Maoridom’s brightest and most contentious moments.

In Mataatua (Wednesday February 8), a historical moment in waka taua (war canoe) history is commemorated in a documentary filmed at the launch of the waka, Mataatua Puhi.

Carved by the legendary Hekenukumai Busby, the waka was launched from Whakatane in a voyage to Northland to commemorate the Mataatua ancestor Puhikaiariki whose descendents went on to form the Ngapuhi iwi.

The documentary features footage of Koro Aukaha (Ngati Awa), Simon Snowdon (Te Rarawa), Moai Tihi (Tuhoe) and Kairau Ngahau (Ngati Awa) as well as interviews with the men charged with hauling the waka to the far north.

In further episodes, the series will showcase the late Dame Miraka Szaszy (Mira Szaszy: Wed Feb 15), the fishing traditions of Te Whanau a Apanui (Moki: Wed Feb 22), the descendants of Te Whakatohea ancestor Mokomoko (Mokomoko: Wed Mar 1 and Wed Mar 8), the formation of kapa haka (haka group) extraordinaire Waka Huia (Ngapo: Wed Mar 15) and more.

Unearth archival Maori treasures, with English language sub titles, on WAKA HUIA in the Te Koputu Taonga slot each Wednesday at 8.30 PM.

Ends

Waka Huia: Mira Szaszy

Maori Television revisits moments in Maori history with the channel’s first-time screening of archival WAKA HUIA documentaries each Wednesday at 8.30 PM.

Broadcast for the first time on Maori Television, the documentaries hark back to iconic Maori issues and personalities that shaped the current direction of Maoridom in the channel’s Te Koputu Taonga (archival treasures) slot from 8.30 PM each Wednesday.

Acquired from Television New Zealand archives, the series screens in the Maori language with English language sub titles for the benefit of all viewers.

WAKA HUIA was first transmitted in 1987 and has since captured over 500 hours of rare footage with esteemed Maori leaders and ventured into marae throughout the country, while revealing Maoridom’s brightest and most contentious moments.

In Mira Szaszy (Wednesday February 15), the flower of the far north’s Muriwhenua iwi, the late Dame Miraka Szaszy, is remembered for her beauty and tenacity through an interview-based documentary with presenter Kingi Ihaka.

The first Maori woman to obtain a university degree and the first Maori woman to come within sight of a Miss New Zealand title, Dame Szaszy was a matriarch who championed women’s suffrage from her home base of Te Hapua.

Raised as one of nine children, Dame Szaszy exemplified courage and leadership. Her paper, Maori Women in Pakeha Society, is an often-accredited piece of literature amongst local and international academics.

Also a driving force behind the Maori Women’s Welfare League, she has been immortalised in recent years with the establishment of the Mira Szaszy Research Centre at the University of Auckland’s Business School.

In further episodes, the series will showcase the fishing traditions of Te Whanau a Apanui (Moki: Wed Feb 22), the descendants of Te Whakatohea ancestor Mokomoko (Mokomoko: Wed Mar 1 and Wed Mar 8), the formation of kapa haka (haka group) extraordinaire Waka Huia (Ngapo: Wed Mar 15) and more.

Unearth archival Maori treasures, with English language sub titles, on WAKA HUIA in the Te Koputu Taonga slot each Wednesday at 8.30 PM.

Ends

Waka Huia: Moki

Maori Television revisits moments in Maori history with the channel’s first-time screening of archival WAKA HUIA documentaries each Wednesday at 8.30 PM.

Broadcast for the first time on Maori Television, the documentaries hark back to iconic Maori issues and personalities that shaped the current direction of Maoridom in the channel’s Te Koputu Taonga (archival treasures) slot from 8.30 PM each Wednesday.

Acquired from Television New Zealand archives, the series screens in the Maori language with English language sub titles for the benefit of all viewers.

WAKA HUIA was first transmitted in 1987 and has since captured over 500 hours of rare footage with esteemed Maori leaders and ventured into marae throughout the country, while revealing Maoridom’s brightest and most contentious moments.

In the Moki episode (Wednesday February 22), kaumatua Ned Waititi and Hohua Waititi (Te Whanau o Kauaetangohia) relay the fishing traditions of Te Whanau a Apanui in the eastern Bay of Plenty and the tribe’s intrinsic relationship with the moki fish.

The documentary also recalls the journey of the Taniui waka and stories of the ancestral brothers Hotupae, Kokatangikiraukawa, Hoturoa and Ruamoengarara, whose disputes would provoke events that led the waka to its final resting place at Kawhia.

In further episodes, the series will showcase the descendants of Te Whakatohea ancestor Mokomoko (Mokomoko: Wed Mar 1 and Wed Mar 8), the formation of kapa haka (haka group) extraordinaire Waka Huia (Ngapo: Wed Mar 15) and more.

Unearth archival Maori treasures, with English language sub titles, on WAKA HUIA in the Te Koputu Taonga slot each Wednesday at 8.30 PM.

Ends

Waka Huia: Mokomoko

Maori Television revisits moments in Maori history with the channel’s first-time screening of archival WAKA HUIA documentaries each Wednesday at 8.30 PM.

Broadcast for the first time on Maori Television, the documentaries hark back to iconic Maori issues and personalities that shaped the current direction of Maoridom in the channel’s Te Koputu Taonga (archival treasures) slot from 8.30 PM each Wednesday.

Acquired from Television New Zealand archives, the series screens in the Maori language with English language sub titles for the benefit of all viewers.

WAKA HUIA was first transmitted in 1987 and has since captured over 500 hours of rare footage with esteemed Maori leaders and ventured into marae throughout the country, while revealing Maoridom’s brightest and most contentious moments.

“Tangohia mai te taura i taku kakii kia waiata au i taku waiata – Take the rope from my neck that I may sing my song”. These are words immortalised by the great Te Whakatohea leader Mokomoko in a two-part feature, Mokomoko (Wednesday March 1 and Wednesday March 8).

Presented by Kingi Ihaka, the documentary weaves a tale of the foundations of Te Whakatohea tribe in the eastern Bay of Plenty through interviews with some of Mokomoko’s descendants including Wairemana Taia, Tapai Biddle, the Reverend Whakahuihui Vercoe and Poai Biddle.

Wrongly arrested and tried for the murder of the priest Carl Sylvius Volkner during the 1865 colonial invasion of Opotiki, the pursuit of a pardon was taken up his descendants in 1981 and granted 11 years later.

The documentary recalls the events leading up to and following the arrest through dialogue handed down to his descendants, 100 years after the fact.

In further episodes, the series will showcase the formation of kapa haka (haka group) extraordinaire Waka Huia (Ngapo: Wed Mar 15) and more.

Unearth archival Maori treasures, with English language sub titles, on WAKA HUIA in the Te Koputu Taonga slot each Wednesday at 8.30 PM.

Ends

Waka Huia: Ngapo

Maori Television revisits moments in Maori history with the channel’s first-time screening of archival WAKA HUIA documentaries every Wednesday at 8.30 PM.

Broadcast for the first time on Maori Television, the documentaries hark back to iconic Maori issues and personalities that shaped the current direction of Maoridom.

WAKA HUIA was first transmitted in 1987 and has since captured over 500 hours of rare footage with esteemed Maori leaders and ventured into marae throughout the country, while revealing Maoridom’s brightest and most contentious moments.

Acquired from Television New Zealand archives, the series screens in the Maori language with English language sub titles for the benefit of all viewers.

The successful kapa haka (haka group) Waka Huia and its founders, Ngapo and Pimia Wehi, take the spotlight on the Ngapo episode, screening on Wednesday March 15.

Filmed during the preparations for the 1992 Aotearoa Traditional Maori Performing Arts Festival, in which the group was placed first overall, the episode includes interviews with kapa haka leaders such as Tini Puanaki, Wiremu Kerekere, Irirangi Tiakiawa, Maihi Nikora, Dr Pita Sharples and more.

The 1992 festival marked the 10th anniversary of the formation of Waka Huia, which made its mark when it was placed first overall for its debut appearance at the 1986 national festival.

Featuring footage of the moko applications under the guidance of ta moko expert Gordon Hatfield and segments of the gold-winning performance itself, the Ngapo episode pays tribute to one of the nation’s consistently best traditional Maori performing arts groups.

Unearth archival Maori treasures, with English language sub titles, on WAKA HUIA in the Te Koputu Taonga slot each Wednesday at 8.30 PM.

Ends

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