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Ballet harnesses the power of three

28 June 2006

The Royal New Zealand Ballet harnesses the power of three

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Season image - Trinity, Artist Monique Richards Photo: Stephen A'Court

Igniting the senses, the spirit, the soul, the Royal New Zealand Ballet presents three energetic and adventurous works in the Lion Foundation Season of Trinity.

“Bold, beautiful choreography is our company’s signature,” says Gary Harris, Artistic Director of the Royal New Zealand Ballet.

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RNZB artists Abigail Boyle and Kate Venables rehearse Banderillero Photo: Maarten Holl.


“We are thrilled to be working with three powerhouse choreographers; each extremely accomplished with their own distinct strengths and styles.”

New Zealand’s own Michael Parmenter will present Les Noces (pro: lay-noss) a dynamic journey through Stravinsky’s extraordinary score. Les Noces explores a peasant wedding through complex choreography and rich characterisation.

Javier De Frutos premieres an intensely anticipated new work, Banderillero (pro: ban-dair-ree-air-ro). He is the creator of the RNZB’s UK Critics Circle National Dance Award-winning Milagros.

Christopher Hampson returns to New Zealand for a full company version of Esquisses (pro: es-keese). He has just been lauded by the New York Times as “a masterly new choreographic voice”.

“We are a classical ballet company with a strong contemporary edge, and Trinity is the perfect way for us to showcase our dancers’ athleticism and skill,” says Gary.

Trinity opens in Wellington at the Westpac St James Theatre 27-30 July, then Auckland 2-5 August and Christchurch 9-12 August.

The RNZB then leaps across the Tasman on the invitation of The Australian Ballet to tour Trinity to Sydney, Brisbane and Melbourne from 16 August –
11 September 2006.

ENDS

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