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Annual chance for Kiwis to pick their top TV stars

Media Release
4 October, 2006


Annual chance for Kiwis to pick their top TV stars


TV Guide readers are being asked to name television's sexiest, hottest and most talented stars in the magazine's annual Best on the Box People's Choice Awards.

The awards, which last year attracted around 240,000 votes across 25 categories, are unique to the entertainment industry in that they are all decided exclusively by TV viewers.

"I think this is what makes them so special," says TV Guide editor Julie Eley.

"There is no political agenda behind these awards, no industry lobbying. No favours being repaid. Simply the people who watch TV deciding what is best on TV. And what better authority could you have than that."

Voters can have their say by filling in a special voting form included in the TV Guide issues on sale October 5 and 12, or make their picks online at www.tv-guide.co.nz/BOTB. All voters go in the draw to win one of two HP media centres valued at $3000 each.

"It's our one chance to tell the celebrities, presenters and hosts what we really think of them," says Julie.

"This year there are a number of new names among the nominees so I am sure we will see some of the categories given a bit of a shake up!"

Last year's winners included Toni Marsh as Sexiest Woman, Simon Dallow as Sexiest Man, Judy Bailey as Best News Presenter, and Robyn Malcolm as Best Actress.

TV Guide is New Zealand's top selling weekly magazine, featuring TV listings ahead of any other publication. The Best on the Box Awards results will be published in the TV Guide issue on sale November 9.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
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