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Crying and Misbehaving - Frontseat this Sunday

Frontseat, 10.20pm this Sunday 8th October on TV ONE.

CRYING MEN:
Frontseat comes to you this weekend from City Gallery Wellington, which opens an exhibition of works by outstanding Brit artist Sam Taylor-Wood. This work features large photographs of 27 big-name male actors in vulnerable moments, along with an infamous video work of David Beckham asleep.

HOW TO CRY:
Inspired by Sam Taylor-Wood, several of New Zealand’s finest theatrical and screen actors discuss – and in some cases demonstrate – the craft of crying within their work. Intimate portraits and honest thoughts make this a story you won’t see anywhere else. Featuring such luminaries as Ian Mune, Rob Mokoraka, Miranda Manasiadis, Cameron Rhodes, Serena Cotton.

THE FRONT ROW:
Opinionated comment from recognisable faces with plenty to say. Keep your eyes peeled for actor Joel Tobeck, radio gal Noelle McCarthy, artist Dick Frizzell & apostrophe police officer Jon Bridges.
This week: Why Art Should Be More Like Sport. Naked Samoan and playwright Mario Gaoa hits the streets of Manukau City to find out what art is missing that sport’s known about all along, and discovers an artist who took up boxing for his latest work on show at Te Tuhi: The Mark in Pakuranga.

DON’T MISBEHAVE:
That’s the theme of this year’s SCAPE Art & Industry Biennial in Christchurch. So Josie McNaught sets out on a quest to discover which artist is misbehaving in public the most. Along the way she meets the awesome Ronnie Van Hout and the man with a huge reputation, Martin Creed. (Madonna awarded him the Turner Prize for the room with the light that turns on and off.)

NOMINATE A GREAT LINE IN KIWI FILM:
Keep those nominations flooding in as we celebrate the craft of scriptwriting! “You’re not a Mexican, you’re a bloody Maori” from Came A Hot Friday is hauling in the nominations at the moment. The Top 10 will be decided by a celebrity jury and revealed on October 22nd.
NOMINATE a Greatest Line in Kiwi Film by emailing gabe[at]frontseat.co.nz.

Send your story ideas and arts diary submissions to Frontseat's researcher Gabe McDonnell at gabe[at]frontseat.co.nz.


ENDS

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