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The Greatest Line In Kiwi Film

The Greatest Line In Kiwi Film


“I’m a Derek, and Dereks don’t run”

A line from Bad Taste’s hero, Derek, written and spoken by Peter Jackson, was revealed as The Greatest Line in Kiwi Film on TV One’s flagship arts show Frontseat in its final episode for 2006.

Two Peter Jackson films, two Geoff Murphy films, and two lines from Once Were Warriors made the shortlist for Frontseat’s Greatest Line in Kiwi Film, after more than 50 nominations were whittled down to a Top Six. Hundreds of public votes saw Jackson’s sci-fi splatter film Bad Taste crowned the winner.

“The winner of the Greatest Line of Dialogue is a definite classic in the canon of Kiwi filmmaking,” said Frontseat host Oliver Driver. “Peter Jackson was thrilled that his line was in the running for the top prize.

“I know a lot of people were expecting the better-known ‘eggs’ line from Once Were Warriors or ‘we’re taking this car to Invercargill’ from Goodbye Pork Pie to win. But something about the Derek line has really captured the public vote.”

The Frontseat Film Jury said it was a “quintessentially Kiwi line”. Jury member Chris Knox said it was his personal favourite of the Top Six. “You could just say ‘Derek’ and it would be hilarious. And it was the moment that Peter Jackson fully became Peter Jackson.”

Oliver Driver added: “Peter Jackson is undoubtedly New Zealand’s greatest filmmaker on a whole lot of levels. Praised mostly as a director, it was actually his scriptwriting skills that won him his first Oscar nomination, for Heavenly Creatures.

“Jackson’s debut effort Bad Taste was made over many, many weekends and the Derek character didn’t even feature in the film’s first version. It wasn’t until another actor left the film that Peter Jackson had to invent a new character. And as he says in his new biography, he’d run out of friends to play the new guy, so he had to cast himself!”

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NB: The Top Six finalists for the Greatest Line in Kiwi Film, in no particular order, as chosen by Frontseat’s Film Jury (Black Sheep producer Philippa Campbell, Headstrong & 48 Hour Film Fest head Anthony Timpson, musician & reviewer Chris Knox, actress Madeleine Sami, Frontseat’s producer’s mum Liz Gracewood and Public Address blogger Russell Brown) were:

- “Cook the man some f*cking eggs”. Jake Heke (Temuera Morrison) in Once Were Warriors. Writer: Riwia Brown, from the novel by Alan Duff
- “I’m a Derek, and Dereks don’t run”. Derek (Peter Jackson) in Bad Taste.
Writer: Peter Jackson
- “I’ve only been Pakeha for one minute and already I hate you Maori”. Puni (the late Tama Poata) in Utu. Writers: Keith Aberdein & Geoff Murphy

- “I know what to do about mother”. Pauline (Melanie Lynskey) in Heavenly Creatures.
Writers: Peter Jackson & Fran Walsh
- “You’re not gonna hurt my babies anymore”. Beth Heke (Rena Owen) in Once Were Warriors. Writer: Riwia Brown
- “We’re taking this bloody car to Invercargill, boy”. John (Tony Barry) in Goodbye Pork Pie. Writers: Ian Mune & Geoff Murphy

ENDS

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