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Be A Secret Santa For Someone In Need

Media Release 3 December 2007

Be A Secret Santa For Someone In Need Of A Christmas Gift

Many companies embrace ‘Secret Santa’ gifting internally at Christmas time, however this year The Salvation Army and Barnardos are urging companies to swap this activity and become true Secret Santa’s for someone less fortunate this Christmas.

The Kmart Wishing Tree Appeal is aiming to exceed last years tally of 21,588 presents collected and distributed by The Salvation Army and Barnardos to families who would have otherwise gone without.

The Salvation Army’s Northern Director for Community Ministries, Gerry Walker, says Christmas is all about giving and there are plenty of deserving families who need a little help to enjoy the holiday season.

“Christmas is a time for festivities, but it is important that we don’t forget there are plenty of New Zealanders struggling with everyday life, let alone the additional pressure that comes with Christmas.

“By placing a present under a Kmart Wishing Tree you become a true Secret Santa, and help to bring to life the magic of Christmas for a child, teenager or struggling mum and dad who would have otherwise missed out,” says Mr Walker.

The Kmart Wishing Tree Appeal is New Zealand’s largest Christmas gift appeal and over the past 12 years has helped more than 147,000 New Zealanders. The presents are distributed within the communities they are donated in by The Salvation Army and Barnardos, the official charities of the Wishing Tree Appeal.

To participate in the Kmart Wishing Tree Appeal, simply place a gift (wrapped or unwrapped) underneath the Wishing Tree at any one of Kmart’s 15 stores across New Zealand. Gifts do not need to be purchased from Kmart – all gifts will be gratefully received and will go towards helping brighten someone’s Christmas.

As an alternative to donating a gift, people can make a cash contribution at any Kmart store register. One hundred per cent of cash contributions are converted by Kmart into Kmart gift vouchers, which are then distributed to people in need by welfare groups, allowing appeal recipients to choose their own Christmas gift. The Wishing Tree Appeal runs until Christmas Eve.

TVNZ Breakfast co-host Pippa Wetzell is supporting the Kmart Wishing Tree Appeal and is available online at Yahoo!Xtra Answers to answer any questions you might have about the appeal. You can visit www.yahooxtra.co.nz to ask your own question.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
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