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Delicia Sampero ­– ­'www.ambasadors.co.nz'

Delicia Sampero ­– ­'www.ambasadors.co.nz'



Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge

Delicia Sampero ­– ­'www.ambasadors.co.nz'

The debate over the effects that television and computerised games have in children's upbringing is the setting for the latest exhibition by West Auckland artist, Delicia Sampero.

Titled www.ambassadors.co.nz, the exhibition will open at Oedipus Rex Gallery in Auckland's CBD on 12 February and will run until March the 1st.

The paintings position delicately crafted portraits of anonymous children against the familiar superheroes and cartoon characters that normally populate many youngsters' little world. Spiderman, Pokémon, Catwoman and Bratz are few of the examples.
The juxtaposition evokes a sense of unease and concern and raises questions on the substances that typically inform children's reality in a consumer culture.

"I wanted to create a contrast between the child and the amazing yet strange world that nourishes his soul", says Ms Sampero
While acknowledging that television and DVD's are valuable educational resources, Ms Sampero says that avoiding a slippery slope is difficult.

"The levels of violence and the speed that I see my son is exposed to, when watching cartoons on TV or playing with PlayStation, are often beyond what my intuition tells me he can cope with.

"While I want my child to have the enjoyment and inspiration, I don't want him to become desensitised or brainwashed by it. The challenge is to guide him to cope and develop an ability to use his own judgement"

As to the title of the exhibition, Ms Sampero comments: "I want to see children as ambassadors in the 'media nation' rather than victims; as representatives of a potential that parents should not be indifferent about.

"I would like to inspire a discussion on the effects of TV, on the content of programmes and on how to use those consciously and creatively."

Ms Sampero's previous exhibition, 'I Am', featured an installation of 50 portraits of prominent members of the local visual and performing art community accompanied by the subject's own identity statements.

Through her career which spans 20 years Ms Sampero has staged exhibitions in New Zealand, Samoa, the U.S, France and Germany.

ENDS

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