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All-Star Line-Up In Sustainability Documentary

All-Star Line-Up Tackles Sustainability In Documentary With Young Filmmakers


Kiritapu
Allan-Beach
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May/June 2008
ALL-STAR LINE-UP TACKLES SUSTAINABILITY IN DOCUMENTARY WITH YOUNG FILMMAKERS

An all-star line-up of Prime Minister Helen Clark, John Key, the Maori King Tuheitia Paki, Oscar nominee Keisha Castle-Hughes, hip-hop pioneer DLT and advertising heavyweight Toby Talbot is put under the spotlight and challenged by young film-makers in a documentary exploring sustainability.

The documentary will be broadcast on Maori Television on June 4th, the night before World Environment Day. It is the climax of The Outlook for Someday film challenge and features five of the winning films. www.theoutlookforsomeday.net

The theme of the documentary is summed up by Rachel Brown, Chief Executive of the Sustainability Business Network, when she says in one of the winning films “What has happened over time is we have become more interested in stuff and less interested in humanity.”

The programme looks at sustainability through the eyes of the younger generation as the film-makers show their films to influential New Zealanders and discuss the issues raised.

The Outlook for Someday is a sustainability film challenge launched in 2007. Young New Zealanders up to the age of 20 made short films about how they see the future unfolding.

The winning films featured in the documentary form a collection of quirky, moving and challenging short films from around the country. They range from a rap music video to an advertisement set in the future.

The films inspire the film-makers and their interviewees to participate in lively dialogue about New Zealand’s ambitions to be a sustainable nation.

The Outlook for Someday documentary has been produced for Maori Television by Connected Media, a charitable trust promoting sustainability through media. It was made with funding from New Zealand On Air.

Connected Media’s previous broadcast project was ‘The Middle-earth Connection’ documentary series about sustainability issues in New Zealand, which was broadcast on BBC World and TV One.


QUOTES FROM THE DOCUMENTARY

Keisha Castle-Hughes – Oscar Nominee
“I think one of the most important things is to take notice. So many of us turn blind eyes to lots of issues because sometimes it’s just too hard to deal with that kind of stuff… You can start with the tiniest things – everyone doing tiny things like reduce – re-use – recycle, the simplest little things”

DLT – Pioneer of New Zealand Hip-Hop
“It’s about being able to look at other people besides our own and find a common ground, and help one-another out.”

Toby Talbot – Executive Creative Director, DDB Advertising
“I like to think that the clients that I will be representing now and in the future will be clients who are motivated to change the world they are living in. Because it’s not about a short-sighted kind of graph, it’s not a bar-chart of sales, it’s more than that.”

Rahui Papa – Spokesperson for Tuheitia Paki, the Maori King
“Papatuanuku will tell us and give us an indication. So will Tangaroa and so will Tane Mahuta. And those atua, they will give us an indication of when they have had enough. And I think that it is just about that time that they are ready to give us a sign. And so we need to be careful and really think about what we are doing to our tupuna.”

Helen Clark – Prime Minister
“I think it is entirely possible to have economic development that is compatible with the environment. And I am firmly of the view that if we can’t show that we are sustainable in what we do and what we are then we are going to be seriously disadvantaged in our economic future. So it’s not a question of either/or. If you want a good future, if you want good living standards, you are going to have to show you are sustainable.”

John Key – Leader of The Opposition
“The way I look at it is getting the balance right between the environment and economic growth… I don’t accept the view that just because you are a wealthier nation with high economic growth you won’t care for your environment. I think you’ve got to balance the two. And I think we’ve got a healthy sense of that.”

For further information:
Angela Griffen 027 578 0889 angela.griffen@tbwawhybin.co.nz
David Jacobs, Connected Media (09) 376 6060 dj@connectedmedia.org

BACKGROUND TO THE OUTLOOK FOR SOMEDAY

In 2007 Connected Media, together with broadcast, educational, funding and sponsorship partners, launched a sustainability film challenge for young New Zealanders - The Outlook for Someday.

The mission for anyone up to the age of 20: make a short film about how you see the future unfolding; look at your world through a lens of sustainability.

There were 20 winning films selected by judges who work in television, education and youth development. They came from throughout New Zealand from film-makers aged 9 to 20. Their stories are told in a wide range of genres including drama, documentary, animation, music video and an advertisement for the planet.

Each of the winning film-makers / teams won a laptop computer donated by The Laptop Company and vouchers donated by The Body Shop.

The 20 winning films have been broadcast on TVNZ 6 and can now be viewed:
 at The Outlook for Someday website: www.theoutlookforsomeday.net
 at TVNZ ondemand
 as podcasts on iTunes

The project partners – Connected Media, The Enviroschools Foundation and the Global Education Centre – are now preparing to launch a second year of the film challenge.

The project funding partners are the Ministry for the Environment, Ministry of Youth Development, Ministry of Education, Save the Children New Zealand and New Zealand On Air.

The project sponsors are The Body Shop New Zealand, The Laptop Company and the Sustainable Business Network.

For updates on The Outlook for Someday: www.theoutlookforsomeday.net


BACKGROUND ON CONNECTED MEDIA/PRODUCER/ PRESENTER & WRITER

Connected Media is a New Zealand based charitable trust with a mission to promote sustainability through media. The Trust develops and distributes films and film projects covering a range of sustainability issues.

Connected Media is a regional partner of the international Television Trust for the Environment (TVE), which was established by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) to facilitate the free-flow of information and ideas via television on environment, development, health and human rights.

www.connectedmedia.org


DAVID JACOBS – Producer/Director

David has been making films on sustainability issues since 1989 - as a producer, director, writer and editor. He received a Prix Leonardo award for Health In The City, a short film he made for the World Health Organization.

Before David came to live in Aotearoa New Zealand in 1992 he was Head of Production at Frontline Video in London and Programme Executive of the international Television Trust for the Environment (TVE).

While in the UK David made
 Viva Nica! for Channel Four in 1990 about popular culture in Nicaragua;
 Thailand For Sale in 1991 for the BBC, SBS and Discovery Europe about the social and environmental fallout from a tourism boom;
 Rainbow Reports, an international series of reports by young environmentalists for the BBC, SBS and Discovery Europe, which was broadcast in 99 countries at the time of the Rio ‘Earth Summit’ in 1992.

In New Zealand David has made
 Edifice for TV One in 1993 about architectural heritage in New Zealand;
 Rubber Gloves Or Green Fingers for TV One in 1997 about New Zealand’s potential as an organic nation;
 The Middle-earth Connection for broadcast on TV One and BBC World in 2005 about sustainability issues in New Zealand.

KIRITAPU ALLAN – Writer/Presenter
Ngati Ranginui, Ngai Te Rangi

Kiritapu (age 24) is currently completing her law degree at Victoria University.

She is a co-founder and co-director of Conscious Collaborations, an indigenous peoples collective which works primarily with indigenous people to build awareness of ways of living which acknowledge and uplift our Earth Mother Papatuanuku.

Kiritapu is committed to raising consciousness around indigenous peoples’ rights, environmental degradation and the interaction of social and environmental politics. She likes to keep things streetwise and organizes collectively around any event, using hip-hop and reggae as tools to spread the word.

She aims to build synergies between indigenous, activist, and creative communities - tuia tangata tuia tumanako!


ENDS

BACKGROUND ON THE OUTLOOK FOR SOMEDAY DOCUMENTARY - SYNOPSIS


SUMMARY

Winners of a sustainability film challenge show their films to some of Aotearoa*s finest and most influential people from the worlds of hip-hop and art, politics, advertising and film.


SYNOPSIS

Kiritapu Allan introduces The Outlook for Someday, a sustainability film challenge for young New Zealanders.

Kiritapu joins five of the winning film-makers, who lay out some challenges and solutions as they show their films to some of Aotearoa*s finest and most influential people from the worlds of hip-hop and art, politics, advertising and film.


TOBY TALBOT

First year Massey Fine Art students Hannah Salmon (18) and Blaine Western (18) of Wellington step into the world of advertising to chat to Toby Talbot, Executive Creative Director of DDB Advertising.

Hannah and Blaine*s film *Post No Bills* critiques the way that advertising infiltrates public spaces and challenges it as lacking social responsibility. Claiming that advertising is a driving force of over-consumption and waste, the film asks whether it has a place in a sustainable world.

As one of Australasia*s most awarded creatives, Toby Talbot played a major role in speaking against the proposed ban on billboards in central Auckland. His clients include McDonalds, New Zealand Lotteries, VW, Cadbury and The Warehouse.

After Toby has watched the film he articulates his views on the role of advertising and discusses with Hannah and Blaine where the line should be drawn between enjoying modern conveniences and living with consideration for our environment.

*I like to think that the clients that I will be representing now and in the future will be clients who are motivated to change the world they are living in. Because it*s not about a short-sighted kind of graph, it*s not a bar-chart of sales, it*s more than that.* - Toby Talbot


KING TUHEITIA

Students of Te Wharekura O Te Rawhitiroa in Whangarei, Erana Walker (17) and Kowhai Henare (17) meet Tuheitia Paki, the Maori King, and speak with his spokesperson Rahui Papa.

Erana and Kowhai show Kingi Tuheitia their film *Tiakina O Tatou Awa* and discuss the role of Maori in caring for Papatuanuku, Mother Earth.

Rahui Papa speaks on the King*s behalf about the Waikato Tainui*s role in the co-management of the Waikato River. Together the group discuss how local rivers are a source of identity and pride for Maori and the urgency of restoring their life-force. Erana and Kowhai share their passion for their local river, Waitaua, and the progress they have made with restoring its health.

*Papatuanuku will tell us and give us an indication. So will Tangaroa and so will Tane Mahuta. And those atua, they will give us an indication of when they have had enough. And I think that it is just about that time that they are ready to give us a sign. And so we need to be careful and really think about what we are doing to our tupuna.* - Rahui Papa


HELEN CLARK AND JOHN KEY

Elam student Ally Palmer (20) of Auckland talks with Prime Minister Helen Clark and Leader of the Opposition John Key about the role that government and policy has to play in creating a sustainable future.

Ally Palmer shows her film *A Sustainable Future* to each of the political leaders. She challenges them to explain how they see the relationship between economic growth and a sustainable future for New Zealand.

Helen Clark*s view is that in order to grow our economy sustainably New Zealand has to become environmentally sustainable, that we need to show leadership on the issue to gain respect around the world.

*I think it is entirely possible to have economic development that is compatible with the environment. And I am firmly of the view that if we can*t show that we are sustainable in what we do and what we are then we are going to be seriously disadvantaged in our economic future. So it*s not a question of either/or. If you want a good future, if you want good living standards, you are going to have to show you are sustainable.* - Helen Clark

John Key*s view is that it is a matter of balancing economic growth with environmental considerations, and that technology has a huge role to play in becoming sustainable.

*The way I look at it is getting the balance right between the environment and economic growth* I don*t accept the view that just because you are a wealthier nation with high economic growth you won*t care for your environment. I think you*ve got to balance the two. And I think we*ve got a healthy sense of that.* - John Key


DLT

Fred Mane (17) and Caleb Tana (18) of Moerewa meet up with DLT, the godfather of New Zealand hip-hop, in an Auckland studio.

The music video *Play Your Part Right* was made by a team of students at Northtec. They come from Moerewa, a small Northland town in which over 80% of the population are Maori.

The message of the video is that everyone has a part to play in building the future of New Zealand. Images of graffiti, pollution and homeless youth are accompanied by rap lyrics, rallying young people to take responsibility for their environment.

Two of the Moerewa film-makers and their tutor meet up with DLT and show him *Play Your Part Right*.

DLT was the first person to scratch on a locally produced record and was a founding member of New Zealand's first hip-hop group, Upper Hutt Posse.

DLT discusses his career and the differences between living in New Zealand and overseas. He encourages the young film-makers to use music to create a positive future for New Zealand.

*It*s about being able to look at other people besides our own and find a common ground, and help one-another out.* - DLT


KEISHA CASTLE-HUGHES

Film student Alwyn Dale (19) of Hamilton shows Keisha Castle-Hughes his advertisement from the future. They discuss the role that their generation can play in creating a sustainable world for generations to come.

As film student Alwyn Dale and Oscar nominee Keisha Castle Hughes sit down to discuss his film *PHASE Promotional Spot,* it becomes evident that they are both young New Zealanders with deep concerns for the environment.

Together they discuss how modern technology has created a social disconnect and how overwhelming the problem of climate change can seem. Keisha talks about her role in the spotlight and her desire to create a better world for her daughter Felicity.

*I think one of the most important things is to take notice. So many of us turn blind eyes to lots of issues because sometimes it*s just too hard to deal with that kind of stuff* You can start with the tiniest things - everyone doing tiny things like reduce - re-use - recycle, the simplest little things*
- Keisha Castle-Hughes

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