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Quade Cooper on TVNZ’s Marae Investigates


From Marae Investigates
16th October, 2011
10am Sunday on TV ONE


Please find below two transcripts. The first is from Marae Investigates this morning, the second the extended interview that’s online on www.tvnz.co.nz this morning.


Maori Wallaby Quade Cooper in a rare one-on-one interview with TVNZ’s Marae Investigates reporter Carmen Parahi , ominously she found him relaxed and determined.

TRANSCRIPT

Reporter Carmen Parahi
Hey it’s really nice to meet you finally. How’s the nerves, you’ve got a big game?

Quade Cooper, Wallabies Fly-Half
It’s going to be a bit of a tough one to be playing them on home soil there’s a lot of meaning in this game for both teams, a lot of the players as well. We have a lot of the boys in the Australian team who are born in New Zealand so I’m sure this game will have extra meaning for each and everyone.

Reporter Carmen Parahi
Is it strange because you’re a Maori boy, is it strange playing for the Wallabies against the All Blacks?

Quade Cooper, Wallabies Fly-Half
In this day and age not so much but I think a few years back it would’ve been. For the length that I’ve lived in Australia , I’ve been there over ten years now so now I’m very accustomed to life in Australia but also I know my roots as well.

Reporter Carmen Parahi
When you watch the haka what’s that like, what’s that feeling?
Do you want to break out and do your own haka in reply, you can?

Quade Cooper, Wallabies Fly-Half
Well I guess sometimes you feel like it because the amount of emotion and passion behind the haka, standing in front of it it’s a little bit different when you’re standing in front of it and you’re standing amongst it so you do get a bit of mixed emotions because you just feel that fire and passion build up and I think I just try and feed off that but yeah it would be a bit of a different look if I was to do it back to the All Blacks.

Reporter Carmen Parahi
So, when you go on to the field against the All Blacks the crowd is going to boo you, how have you been coping with that?

Quade Cooper, Wallabies Fly-Half
I personally take it as a compliment If they’re that worried about me personally that they’ve got to go to that level of booing and stuff like that then I’ll take that as a compliment. That’s the way I look at life take the positives out of every situation that you have on your hands. I’m in a very privileged situation playing for the Wallabies in the semi-final in the Rugby World Cup not many other people can say they’ve played in the Rugby World Cup let alone a semi-final. I enjoy every moment I look for the positives in things and when someone’s booing it means they’re worrying about you so that’s how I look at it.

Reporter Carmen Parahi
Do you think you owe Richie McCaw or the New Zealand public an apology?

Quade Cooper, Wallabies Fly-Half
No, not at all. I feel every time I go out on the field I’m going to play as hard as I can. I’m going to do whatever I can to the best player I can be for my team every time. I’ve played in the gold jumper I’ve given 110% whether it be against the All Blacks whoever, South Africa or any other team so I’m not going to apologise for anything.

Reporter Carmen Parahi
What do you think of Aaron Cruden?

Quade Cooper, Wallabies Fly-Half
He’s a very talented young man who’s been through a lot throughout his life it’s great to see him doing well. The things that he’s been through the tests he’s had to face up to are things I couldn’t even imagine so it’s just a credit to him having such a strong will to firstly get over the health issues he’s had and now being out there for the All Blacks there’s a lot of people out there who’re supporting him.

Reporter Carmen Parahi
So you’ll be targeting him then no doubt he’s your opposite?

Quade Cooper, Wallabies Fly-Half
Yeah well we’re playing opposite each other I won’t be out there to do him any favours likewise he won’t be out there to do me any favours but you know that’s the way that the game goes there has to be a winner there has to be a loser and I’m trying to do the best that I can to come out on the winning side.

Reporter Carmen Parahi
Did you think when you were growing up in Tokoroa you would get to the Rugby World Cup?

Quade Cooper, Wallabies Fly-Half
The biggest thing is not letting anyone squash your dream as a young boy growing up in Tokoroa I never let that happen no matter how many people said I was too small, I was too slow, your boots aren’t good enough stuff like that I didn’t care if I played in bare feet it was never going to stop me from being where I wanted to be and that was playing at the top

Reporter Carmen Parahi
Was it the All Blacks that you followed then, that you loved and you wanted to be?

Quade Cooper, Wallabies Fly-Half
I remember spending hours out in the backyard stepping past trees and just making imaginary people. I’d pretend I was running down the sideline and then I’d transform into Christian Cullen and you’re sidestepping past the washing line to score a match winning try and something like. Just watching guys like that and having that basically that seed in the back of your mind you want to be like them you want to achieve what they’ve achieved or you want to make it to the top. I think having that competitiveness even with yourself, I think that’s where it all starts.

Reporter Carmen Parahi
You’re living the dream now aren’t you, this is the passion, this is the thing you wanted to do, the Rugby World Cup?

Quade Cooper, Wallabies Fly-Half
I’ve always looked at the World Cup as a place where I wanted to be on the biggest stage in the world in front of all your supporters all your critics as well it’s about proving to yourself that that’s where you belong.

END OF ON-AIR TRANSCRIPT


ONLINE TRANSCRIPT – EXTENDED INTERVIEW

Reporter Carmen Parahi
Hey it’s really nice to meet you finally. How’s the nerves, you’ve got a big game?

Quade Cooper, Wallaby Fly-Half
More of an exciting game playing against NZ so it’s going to be a bit of a tough one to be playing them on home soil there’s a lot of meaning in this game for both teams, a lot of the players as well. We have a lot of the boys in the Australian team who are born in NZ so I’m sure this game will have extra meaning for each and every one

Reporter Carmen Parahi
Is it strange, because you’re a Maori boy, is it strange playing for the Wallabies for the All Blacks?

Quade Cooper, Wallaby Fly-Half
In this day and age not so much but I think a few years back it would’ve been. For the length that I’ve lived in Australia, I’ve been there over ten years now so now I’m very accustomed to life in Australia but also I know my roots as well so there is a bit of tooing and froing at some stage and especially in the household but I enjoy playing for Australia

Reporter Carmen Parahi
When you watch the haka what’s that like, what’s that feeling?
Do you want to break out, do your own haka or you want to reply, you can?

Quade Cooper, Wallaby Fly-Half
Well I guess sometimes you feel like it because the amount of emotion and passion behind the haka. Standing in front of it it’s a little bit different when you’re standing in front of it and you’re standing amongst it so you do get a bit of mixed emotions because you just feel that fire and passion build up. I think I just try and feed off that but yeah it would be a bit of a different look if I was to do it back to the All Blacks.

Reporter Carmen Parahi
Might consider it?

Quade Cooper, Wallaby Fly-Half
Well I’ll have to think about it now

Reporter Carmen Parahi
Well you’ve got enough New Zealanders in the Australian team they could support you couldn’t they?

Quade Cooper, Wallaby Fly-Half
Yeah well I hope so you’ve planted a seed now

Reporter Carmen Parahi
So, when you go on to the field against the All Blacks the crowd are going to boo you, how have you been coping with that?

Quade Cooper, Wallaby Fly-Half
I personally take it as a compliment If they’re that worried about me personally that they’ve got to go to that level of booing and stuff like that then I’ll take that as a compliment. That’s the way I look at life take the positives out of every situation that you have on your hands. I’m in a very privileged situation playing for the Wallabies in the semi-final in the RWC not many other people can say they’ve played in the Rugby World Cup let alone a semi- final I enjoy every moment I look for the positives in things and when someone’s booing it means they’re worrying about you so that’s how I look at it.

Reporter Carmen Parahi
Do you think you owe Richie McCaw or the NZ public an apology?

Quade Cooper, Wallaby Fly-Half
No, not at all. I feel every time I go out on the field I’m going to play as hard as I can I’m going to do whatever I can to the best player I can be for my team. Every time I’ve played in the gold jumper I’ve given 110% whether it be against the All Blacks whoever, South Africa or any other team so I’m not going to apologise for anything.

Reporter Carmen Parahi
Piri Weepu what do you think of him and Aaron Cruden they’re Maori players as well?

Quade Cooper, Wallaby Fly-Half
Yeah Piri’s a class act he’s been around for awhile and Cruden’s only just coming through but he’s a very talented young man who’s been through a lot throughout his life it’s great to see him doing well and there’s another story there. The things that he’s been through the tests he’s had to face up to are things I couldn’t even imagine. So it’s just a credit to him having such a strong will to firstly get over the health issues he’s had and now being out there for the All Blacks there’s a lot of people out there who’re supporting him.

Reporter Carmen Parahi
So you’ll be targeting him then no doubt he’s your opposite?

Quade Cooper, Wallaby Fly-Half
Yeah well we’re playing opposite each other. I won’t be out there to do him any favours likewise he won’t be out there to do me any favours but you know that’s the way that the game goes there has to be a winner there has to be a loser. I’m trying to do the best that I can to come out on the winning side.

Reporter Carmen Parahi
Born in Auckland moved to Tokoroa?

Quade Cooper, Wallaby Fly-Half
Once my mum and dad split ways mum moved to Tokoroa and took me and my sister with her so it was a great upbringing. There’s a lot of things my mum went through by herself so I’m very proud of her for bringing me and my sister up by herself and then the rest of my family with my dad David.

Reporter Carmen Parahi
Your little brother, especially Reuben he’s a fan of the All Blacks how does that play out with the two of you?

Quade Cooper, Wallaby Fly-Half
I just support him whatever he likes to do you know I’m not going to stand over him and tell him you have to support any other team.

It’s just that passion he has for rugby that I’m really excited about he loves the game so much. It reminds me of myself when I was a young kid just how much passion for rugby I had and I still do but just seeing it come out through him it really excites me and every time I go watch him play he’s a bit of a freak as well.

It’s good to see such passion in a young kid but he is supporting the All Blacks so I’ve got back-up with my other little brother Moses he supports the Wallabies.

Reporter Carmen Parahi
But they love you and they think you’re the best rugby player?

Quade Cooper, Wallaby Fly-Half
Yeah they do it’s good to have support like that isn’t it, some people think you’re the best so um, it’s good my two little brothers they love rugby they love watching me play just as much as I love watching them play as well. So hopefully they can follow my footsteps if they want it enough I’m sure that they’ll make it.

Reporter Carmen Parahi
Did you think when you were growing up in Tokoroa you would get to the Rugby World Cup?

Quade Cooper, Wallaby Fly-Half
I think as a kid in Tokoroa growing up I always had that dream and it’s not letting anybody squash those dreams and that’s what can hold some people back is getting outside your comfort zone and being afraid to fail I think that’s what people get most nervous about. Once you put yourself in that position then you start testing yourself am I good enough to be here, should I be here, just got to keep working harder and harder.

The biggest thing is not letting anyone squash your dream as a young boy growing up in Tokoroa I never let that happen no matter how many people said I was too small, I was too slow, your boots aren’t good enough stuff like that I didn’t care if I played in bare feet. It was never going to stop me from being where I wanted to be and that was playing at the top.

Now that I’m there I’ve reassessed my goals and it’s about winning trophies and being the best player I can be but that’s just got to start at not being afraid to fail.

People say like in the weekend I didn’t have the best game but I went out there and gave 100% I didn’t shy away from anything and that’s where I see the success coming

Reporter Carmen Parahi
Was it the All Blacks that you followed then, that you loved and you wanted to be?

Quade Cooper, Wallaby Fly-Half
Yeah well there was the All Blacks and also the Warriors. I remember spending hours out in the backyard stepping past trees and just making imaginary people at that stage when I was a young kid there was the likes of Gene Ngamu in the Warriors, guys like that. Sean Hoppe I was just like pretending to be them with Hoppe’s speed and stuff like that. I’d pretend I was running down the sideline and then I’d transform into Christian Cullen and you’re sidestepping past the washing line to score a match winning try and something like that. Just watching guys like that and having that basically that seed in the back of your mind you want to be like them you want to achieve what they’ve achieved or you want to make it to the top and I think having that competitiveness even with yourself I think that’s where it all starts.

Reporter Carmen Parahi
Would you ever play for the NZ Maori team? Would you like to?

Quade Cooper, Wallaby Fly-Half
Yeah well it’s a hard one to answer because I’d like to play the game at the highest level for as long as possible. But if the opportunity arose to play for the Maori where you can still keep your Wallaby jumper then I’d definitely wouldn’t pass that up but at the same time though this is my career this is my job basically you don’t want to ever put that in jeopardy whether it be for form or anything else you want to keep playing it at the top that’s been my dream my whole life to play at the top for as long as possible.

Reporter Carmen Parahi
Can you just explain your ta moko?

Quade Cooper, Wallaby Fly-Half
It was about when I was 18 years old around the same time my grandfather passed away that’s his name tattooed there and it was just more about remembering my background, my family the things that are most important to me which are my family. So there’s a lot of people who have their opinions especially about me playing for Australia and then also having these tattoos on me so for me it’s just about what it means to me and no one else can take that away from they’re there to stay and they have a lot of meaning behind them for myself

Reporter Carmen Parahi
Have you had criticism over them?

Quade Cooper, Wallaby Fly-Half
Yup. A lot of people are saying you should take them off your arm because you play for the wallabies and stuff like that but I see it as playing for one country doesn’t take away where you come from or where your culture lies

Reporter Carmen Parahi
You’re living the dream now aren’t you, this is the passion, this is the thing you wanted to do, the Rugby World Cup?

Quade Cooper, Wallaby Fly-Half
I’ve always looked at the World Cup as a place where I wanted to be on the biggest stage in the world in front of all your supporters all your critics as well. It’s about proving to yourself that that’s where you belong.

ENDS


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