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Christchurch 22.2: Beyond the Cordon Commemorative Edition

Christchurch 22.2: Beyond the Cordon Commemorative Edition

Following the huge success of Christchurch 22.2: Beyond the Cordon, Hachette New Zealand and the New Zealand Police have released a stunning new boxed edition to coincide with the first anniversary of the devastating February 22, 2011 earthquake.

This freshly packaged commemorative edition comes complete with the original book of police photographs, along with a slipcase, 200 new still images from the New Zealand Police photographers, a 15-minute DVD containing New Zealand Police video footage and readings by Gary McCormick of his two original poems which are included in the book.

First released in September 2011, Christchurch 22.2: Beyond the Cordon has been on the New Zealand non-fiction bestsellers list ever since. As with the original publication, all royalties from the commemorative edition are being donated to Christchurch’s Family Help Trust.

The Family Help Trust has already received royalties of $140,000 with more to come.

“A large part of the reason we published this book was the opportunity to assist the work of the Family Help Trust. They do very important work and we are honoured to be able to help them achieve their aims,” says Kevin Chapman, Managing Director of Hachette New Zealand.

For the Family Help Trust, the financial support from the book has meant they can finally provide some much needed resources for their work. Says Libby Robins, Director of the Family Help Trust, “The amount we have received from this publication has far exceeded our wildest expectations”.

Hachette New Zealand was approached by the Canterbury District Police to produce a high-quality book of colour photography taken by police forensic photographers, documenting the response to the earthquake.

Assistant Commissioner Dave Cliff says "New Zealand Police have been astounded at the success of Christchurch 22.2: Beyond the Cordon. The work of our forensic photographers usually goes unseen, but their efforts in the aftermath of the earthquake have clearly struck a chord with readers across New Zealand. It's also been gratifying to see the amount of money raised for The Family Help Trust from sales of the book. We're delighted that something positive has come out of the city's tragedy."

The 208-page book has 256 evocative photographs shot by police photographers throughout the massive rescue and recovery operation. The police photographers were the only photographers allowed to work for extended periods inside the cordoned area of the CBD known as the ‘Red Zone’.

About Family Help Trust
Family Help Trust provides intensive early intervention home visiting support to some of our most vulnerable families and their infants in Christchurch. The service is provided by highly skilled professionally social workers with small caseloads who are able to spend the time necessary in order to assist families to make life changing decisions. Families who present with significant psycho/social needs are enrolled during pregnancy, where possible, and can continue to receive until the infant enters the primary school system. The ongoing aftershocks and associated stress has increased the vulnerability of many of these families who have little in the way of personal resilience.

ENDS

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