Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 

South Coast Film Screening On Home Ground

South Coast Film Screening On Home Ground

A film inspired by a Wellington bus driver will bring together two grassroots organisations fostering community sustainability.

Set on Wellington’s South Coast and directed by Island Bay filmmakers, Hook, Line and Sinker is the perfect film to fundraise for the growing Wellington Timebank, and will provide an opportunity for locals to meet the film’s actors and directors.

Produced by local company Torchlight Films, the film was made with a unique, sustainable budget model. Director Andrea Bosshard believes that the prevalent filmmaking model struggles with issues of sustainability. Everyone involved in the production of Hook, Line and Sinker was paid the same, regardless of their position. The film was completed on a shoestring budget and was self-distributed to over fifty cinemas throughout New Zealand to maximise returns to the cast and crew.

The Wellington Timebank also has an innovative currency model, with every Timebanker’s skills valued equally and traded for time credits. The Timebank is working to build resilient local communities by encouraging Wellingtonians to exchange skills, knowledge and expertise with people in their neighbourhood.

The fundraising film screenings, the first in Island Bay, offer a chance for local residents to meet the actors and filmmakers and mix with their neighbours in the spirit of timebanking. More than 50 New Zealand cinemas have shown Hook, Line and Sinker and Island Bay Timebanker Sonya Cameron is excited to see it on home ground, “It’s set on the South Coast, and the directors live in my neighbourhood; it’s great to get out and celebrate local film in our community”.

Inspired by a chance sighting of a bus driver swimming in Houghton Bay, Hook, Line and Sinker tells the working class story of a truck driver (Rangimoana Taylor) who faces unemployment as his eyesight fails. His family, including award winning actors Carmel McGlone and Geraldine Brophy, conspire to take over his breadwinning duties. The entire film was shot locally in Wellington including South Coast beaches, the Willis Street WINZ office and St. Mary of the Angels church in Boulcott Street.

Wellington Timebank and Torchlight Films present fundraising screenings of Hook, Line and Sinker at Wellington South Baptist Church in Island Bay on Saturday 22nd and Sunday 23rd of September. Coffee and cake is available for $5 from 6.30pm, film starts at 7.30pm, Q & A with the filmmakers and actors follows. Tickets are $15 or $10 for concession with ID. Tickets available from www.wellingtontimebank.org.nz or on the door.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Snow Business: Coronet Peak Turns 70

In 1947 Coronet Peak in Queenstown opened with just a rope tow pulling keen skiers up a mountain, the first commercial ski field to open in New Zealand. More>>

Howard Davis: 'Dunkirk'

The British have an extraordinary penchant for celebrating catastrophic military defeats. It is not only the Battle of Hastings, the Charge of the Light Brigade, and Gallipoli that have become immortalized in prose, poetry, and movies ...
More>>

Conservation: Gecko Stolen From DOC Visitor Centre

A long-term resident at the Fiordland National Park Visitor Centre has been stolen. The Marlborough green gecko was reported missing on 19 July. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Rare Ingredients

When I heard Kiazim was publishing a cookbook, I jumped at the opportunity... I was back in New Zealand, but how hard could it be to create Turkish-Cypriot cuisine on the opposite side of the world? Well, it turns out — pretty damn hard. More>>

Remembrance: British Memorial Design Revealed

After years of work with Weta Workshop, the British High Commission has revealed the final design of the United Kingdom’s presence in Pukeahu National War Memorial Park. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: The Whole Intimate Mess

Alison McCulloch: Walker’s account of what she went through is harrowing and intimate, and, at risk of sounding trite, very brave. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland