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South Coast Film Screening On Home Ground

South Coast Film Screening On Home Ground

A film inspired by a Wellington bus driver will bring together two grassroots organisations fostering community sustainability.

Set on Wellington’s South Coast and directed by Island Bay filmmakers, Hook, Line and Sinker is the perfect film to fundraise for the growing Wellington Timebank, and will provide an opportunity for locals to meet the film’s actors and directors.

Produced by local company Torchlight Films, the film was made with a unique, sustainable budget model. Director Andrea Bosshard believes that the prevalent filmmaking model struggles with issues of sustainability. Everyone involved in the production of Hook, Line and Sinker was paid the same, regardless of their position. The film was completed on a shoestring budget and was self-distributed to over fifty cinemas throughout New Zealand to maximise returns to the cast and crew.

The Wellington Timebank also has an innovative currency model, with every Timebanker’s skills valued equally and traded for time credits. The Timebank is working to build resilient local communities by encouraging Wellingtonians to exchange skills, knowledge and expertise with people in their neighbourhood.

The fundraising film screenings, the first in Island Bay, offer a chance for local residents to meet the actors and filmmakers and mix with their neighbours in the spirit of timebanking. More than 50 New Zealand cinemas have shown Hook, Line and Sinker and Island Bay Timebanker Sonya Cameron is excited to see it on home ground, “It’s set on the South Coast, and the directors live in my neighbourhood; it’s great to get out and celebrate local film in our community”.

Inspired by a chance sighting of a bus driver swimming in Houghton Bay, Hook, Line and Sinker tells the working class story of a truck driver (Rangimoana Taylor) who faces unemployment as his eyesight fails. His family, including award winning actors Carmel McGlone and Geraldine Brophy, conspire to take over his breadwinning duties. The entire film was shot locally in Wellington including South Coast beaches, the Willis Street WINZ office and St. Mary of the Angels church in Boulcott Street.

Wellington Timebank and Torchlight Films present fundraising screenings of Hook, Line and Sinker at Wellington South Baptist Church in Island Bay on Saturday 22nd and Sunday 23rd of September. Coffee and cake is available for $5 from 6.30pm, film starts at 7.30pm, Q & A with the filmmakers and actors follows. Tickets are $15 or $10 for concession with ID. Tickets available from or on the door.


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