Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


A world first NZ rail tourism venture to launch in October

18 September 2012

A world first New Zealand rail tourism venture to launch in October

A beautiful and isolated corner of New Zealand will soon be open to travel from a truly unique perspective – a self-driving rail cart.

From 13 October 2012, Forgotten World Adventures will be offering the chance to travel on rail carts along the disused railway line which runs between Stratford in Taranaki and Okahukura near Taumarunui in the Ruapehu district.

This region, often referred to as the Forgotten World, is a window into New Zealand’s pioneering history with pristine native bush, rugged hills and isolated farms. With trips ranging from a half day to a two day journey covering the full 140 kilometres of this historic line, experiencing the adventure of the Forgotten World has never been easier.

Forgotten World Adventures is the brainchild of entrepreneur Ian Balme, who secured a 30-year lease to the line which was mothballed by KiwiRail in 2009.

“This truly is a journey like no other. It’s a magical part of the country and travelling by rail cart has to be the best way to see it,” Mr Balme said.

George Hickton, former Chief Executive of Tourism New Zealand and now a professional company director, is a big fan of the journey. "The Forgotten World Adventures self-drive railway experience has to be the best possible way to explore this unique region,” Mr Hickton said.

“This innovative kiwi business has the potential to link visitors and locals for mutual benefit and bring to life the history and lifestyle of a region forgotten by most of us," Mr Hickton added.

After seeing the runaway success of the Otago Central Rail Trail, Mr Balme is confident Forgotten World Adventures offers a significant economic development opportunity for the region. In little more than a decade, the Otago Central Rail Trail has grown into a business attracting thousands of visitors a year and contributing millions of dollars to local businesses, testament to the strong appeal of rail-based tourism.

KiwiRail's General Manager, Passenger Services, Deborah Hume said it was enthusiastic about the opportunity for Forgotten World Adventures to raise interest in rail-based tourism. “It is great to see a line that had to be mothballed being used again to bring tourism to the region," Ms Hume said.

The Forgotten World Adventures rail carts are either two or four seater, petrol driven and have a maximum speed of 20 kilometres per hour. In what is believed to be a world first, the carts are fully self-driving: the driver has complete control over acceleration and braking. The journeys are semi-guided, with the beauty of travelling by rail cart the ability to stop and admire the scenery at any time.

“This unforgettable trip will be enjoyed by everyone from young to old and in between, with its unique perspective on New Zealand’s rugged landscape and pioneering past,” Mr Balme said.

www.forgottenworldadventures.co.nz

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Howard Davis: Never Too Old To Rock & Roll - Jethro Tull

As Greil Marcus recently observed in an NYRB review of Robbie Robertson's autobiographical Testimony, in rock and roll there is always an origin story. In the case of Jethro Tull founder Ian Anderson, he claims to have been influenced by his father's big band and jazz record collections and the emergence of rock music in the 1950s, but became disenchanted with the "show biz" style of early US stars like Elvis Presley... More>>

October: Alice Cooper Returns To NZ

It was March 1977 when Alice Cooper undertook his first ever concert tour of New Zealand – and broke attendance records. 40 years on and this revered entertainer continues to surprise and exude danger at every turn, thrilling audiences globally! More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: The Contemporary Relevance Of Denial

Denial has all the hallmarks of a riveting courtroom drama. Based on a 1996 British libel case that author David Irving brought against Lipstadt, the movie has been criticized as flat and stagey, but it nonetheless conveys a visceral clarity of vision and sense of overwhelming urgency. More>>

Obituary: John Clarke Dies Aged 68

Andrew Little: “I grew up with Fred Dagg and I am devastated by John Clarke’s death. He taught us to laugh at ourselves and more importantly laugh at our politicians.” More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis: Colin McCahon's 'on Going Out With The Tide'

Curated by Wystan Curnow and Robert Leonard, On Going Out with the Tide features major works that have been assembled from public and private collections across New Zealand and Australia. It focusses on McCahon’s evolving engagement with Māori subjects and themes, ranging from early treatments of koru imagery to later history paintings which refer to Māori prophets and investigate land-rights issues. More>>

Howard Davis: Rodger Fox Gets Out The Funk

By now a living New Zealand legend, band leader and trombonist Rodger Fox has performed with some of the biggest names in the jazz business, including Louie Bellson, Bill Reichenbach, Chuck Findley, Randy Crawford, Bobby Shew, Lanny Morgan, Bruce Paulson, Diane Schuur, Arturo Sandoval, David Clayton-Thomas, and Joe Williams, to name only a few. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news