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Urban Dance Shakes the Shed

Atamira Dance
Company presents TOHU2 - photo credit John

MEDIA RELEASE: for immediate release

Urban Dance Shakes the Shed

Atamira Dance Company presents
urban disturbance | Double bill programme 2012

Atamira, New Zealand’s leading Maori dance company, bravely ‘lifts-the-lid’ off the ‘artistic box’ with their new signature double bill programme TOHU - urban disturbance. For three nights only, the sophisticated grunge of ‘SHED 1’, Corban Estate Art Centre, opens its doors for this exclusive season from 22-24 November.

TOHU fuses spoken word, video projection, live waiata and electronic music in a dance performance celebrating elements of urban identity and disturbance while exploring new territory in Maori Contemporary Dance. Comprised of two half hour works; MOKO is choreographed by Artistic Director Moss Patterson and MITIMITI by founding company member, Jack Gray. Excerpts of both works featured in Atamira’s KAHA-Short Works programme earlier this year to rave reviews. This double bill that is TOHU is the perfect platform for Atamira to launch both MOKO and MITIMITI as standalone choreographic works.

Fluid, Kinetic and Driving - MOKO is a dynamic, dance work inspired by the ancient art form known in Maoridom as ‘ta moko’ or body tattoo. The act of marking oneself permanently comes more easily to some than others. Why are some people so ready to make a mark while others take a lifetime to express their identity on their skin? MOKO is a metaphor for becoming whole. The changing nature of self identity is explored as Bodies are twisted and stretched transforming the space visually using elastic rope, live feed video, and a buzzing electronic sound score.
MOKO ignites the space taking the art form of ta moko on a spiraling never ending choreographic journey.

“intricate spiralling patterns slowly build, reverse and break off for a new layer to be laid down on the skins of six dancers. The pace steadily increases, but the patterning holds true, until the work ends with the resting bodies of the newly tattooed.”
NZ Herald, Raewyn Whyte

Chaotic, Dark & Funny - MITIMITI is an eclectic, avant-garde, work that responds to personal experiences of separation, dispossession and loss of land in Mitimiti, North Hokianga. MITIMITI asks questions about the idealism of humanity in contemporary times. Where is home inside us? What confronts and uplifts us? What makes things authentic? MITIMITI is a celebration of the universality of finding our place and feeling at ease with the notion of home. Urban Maori identity has been shaped by features of urban disturbance including loss of reo, spiritual practices and Maori worldview.
Using spoken word, a live sound score, microphone and pedal choreography, MITIMITI is an exhilarating, progressive, and edgy performance.

“An eclectic, disorientated, humorous collage of movements where unison was often squashed with moments of the absurd... Life in an urban, globalised society can be absurd... we can be absurd, I get that... and thus feel a warmth to the characters on stage navigating such realities.” NZ Theatreview, Tia Reihana Morunga , 2012

A richly layered and stimulating double-bill programme of dance, TOHU delivers an intensity of total experience. Join Atamira in their home studio / performance space for TOHU – Urban Disturbance.

Choreographers: Moss Patterson, Jack Gray Dancers: Taane Mete, Jack Gray, Mark Bonnington, Daniel Cooper, Kelly Nash, Nancy Wijohn, & Bianca Hyslop Lighting Design: Vanda Karolczak

TOHU plays;
22 – 24 November, 7.30pm | SHED 1, Corban Estate Arts Centre, 426 Great North Road, Henderson, Waitakere
TICKETS Limited door sales
Early-bird (before 19 October): Adults $30 | Concession $20
Pre- purchase: Adults $35 | Concession $25 | Child 12 and under $15 | Group booking of 6 or more $20pp
Adults $40 | Concession $30 | Child 12 and under $20 Book at*booking fees apply

BAR / CAFÉ / MUSIC /ART on site


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