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Magical Flash Mob at Diwali Mella

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Magical Flash Mob at Diwali Mella

A flashmob with a difference surprised on-lookers on Sunday 14th October 2012 as part of the celebrations for the Diwali Festival at Auckland City, also known as the Festival of Lights.


260 mobbers surprised the crowd at the Auckland City Diwali Mella to spread JOY by blowing soap bubbles to the romantic classic ‘Phela Nasha’ before 130 broke into dance set to the infamous ‘May Main Toh Raste Se Jaa Raha Tha’ from Coolie No 1’.


Padma Akula spent 5 months planning the flash mob with the aim of bringing people from different walks of life together, to have fun and spread Joy. This was not her first time organising a flashmob, however.


In December 2011 her first flashmob hit headlines with a dance set to a popular Indian song by Dhanush "Why this Kolaveri Di" in downtown Auckland, It went viral and was featured on CNN USA and the Times of India. In March 2012 a flashmob was performed at the colourful Holi festival at the Telstra Clear in Manukau set to the song, 'Sachin Anthem' which payed tribute to cricketer Sachin Tendulkar.


The Diwali Festival, also known as the Indian New Year, is New Zealand’s biggest celebration of Indian culture. Dance competitions, street theatre and stalls were on display, boasting a variety of Indian food and goods that spilled out of Aotea Square and onto Queen street.


“The vibe was amazing,” said Akula, “the energy from the dancers and the smiles on the crowd watching the flash mob made all the planning worthwhile – it made me feel like we did what we came to do - to spread joy!”

-ENDS-

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