Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Confidence boosted by new-found cycling skills

28 November 2012

Confidence boosted by new-found cycling skills

Local events such as the Porirua Grand Traverse could have dozens more cycling entries in coming years, thanks to the KiwiSport-funded initiative Pedal Ready.

Almost 60 pupils at both Russell School and Corinna School in Porirua have completed the basic cycling skills programme. Many children got on a bike for the first time and finished Pedal Ready with greater overall confidence.

Since October, 45 Year 5 and 6 Corinna School pupils have learned about helmet and bike safety checks and practised their balance, control skills and hand signals. They’ve also found out how a bike operates.

“Many children couldn’t ride a bike before we began the programme,” says Year 5 and 6 teacher Liam Smiley. “By the end they were really buzzing and very excited by the fact they were riding a bike. The programme gave them confidence and motivation and most picked the skills up really fast.”

Pedal Ready is available free of charge to school children in the Wellington region and is split into two grades: the initial grade provides three, one- hour sessions teaching bike handling and cycle control in an off-road environment; grade two training takes place on roads in realistic conditions.

Earlier this year several senior students at Russell School completed both Pedal Ready grades. Principal Sose Annandale said the improvement in pupil’s interest in cycling, confidence and competence was remarkable.

en Velo received $107,500 from KiwiSport through Sport Wellington to deliver Pedal Ready to schools in the Wellington area over the next three years, in partnership with the Greater Wellington Regional Council. Already more than 450 children from 12 schools throughout the region have completed the basic cycling skills programme. In addition about 30 adults have attended instructor training sessions.

Pedal Ready regional coordinator Marilyn Northcotte says learning to work the myriad of moving parts on a bike – pedals, handle bars, brakes and gears – all simultaneously, helps children to exercise their manipulative skills, coordination and body sense.

“As children learn cycling skills they develop body awareness and explore movement. They gain balance and learn about transferring their weight. Children also learn about relationships to people and objects as they copy the instructor, follow their peers and move in and out of obstacles,” says Marilyn.

The course also prepares children for future riding – whether that is out with friends or family, on the bmx track, riding on the road, mountain biking or participating in events such as the Porirua Grand Traverse.

KiwiSport Manager Peter Woodman-Aldridge says Pedal Ready is a programme which motivates children to get out and enjoy riding a bike safely. “The Wellington region has hundreds of kilometres of bike trails in which kids can use. Pedal Ready gives them the opportunity and motivation to use these new-found cycling skills.”

For more information on KiwiSport please go to sportwellington.org.nz/kiwisport

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Max Rashbrooke: Review - The NZSO And Nature

This was a lovely, varied concert with an obvious theme based on the natural world. It kicked off with Mendelssohn's sparkling Hebrides Overture, which had a wonderfully taut spring right from the start, and great colour from the woodwinds, especially the clarinets. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news