Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


70 year old recordings from Māori soldiers rediscovered

Manatū Taonga/Ministry for Culture and Heritage

29 November


70 year old recordings from Māori soldiers rediscovered in time for Christmas


Today recordings made by wounded Māori troops in North Africa 70 years ago have gone up on the 28th Māori Battalion website www.28maoribattalion.org.nz and help recognise official winding up of the 28th Māori Battalion Association this weekend. The recordings were personal messages to be broadcast back home in time for Christmas, however the identity of some of the soldiers on the recording still remains a mystery.

The recording was made by the National Broadcasting Service (now Radio New Zealand), which had a mobile recording unit that travelled overseas with the 2nd New Zealand Expeditionary Force. In the early 1940s this was cutting-edge technology, recording sound onto acetate discs in a mobile studio in the back of a specially fitted-out Bedford truck that travelled through the deserts of North Africa and on through Italy with New Zealand forces.

Sound Archives Nga Taonga Korero preserves and maintains these recordings, and archivist Sarah Johnston came upon this taonga while researching seasonal Christmas audio last month.

“The original description of this 1942 recording was ‘Christmas carols from staff and patients at No. 2 New Zealand General Hospital, North Africa’”, she explains. “On listening to it we found messages from doctors and nurses and descriptions of Christmas Day celebrations in the hospital, and then a group of Māori patients is introduced, led by Nurse Wiki Katene of Porirua (Ngati Toa).

They sing “Silent Night/Marie te po” and then, while the choir sings “Tama Ngakau Marie” in the background, 14 men introduce themselves and send greetings in Māori to whanau back home”.

You can listen to recordings on the 28 Māori Battalion website:

http://www.28maoribattalion.org.nz/audio/christmas-messages-m%C4%81ori-patients-north-africa-1942

Because of the background singing and the age of the audio, some of the voices were hard to decipher, but by enhancing the audio historian Dr Monty Soutar of the Ministry for Culture and Heritage and coordinator of the 28 Māori Battalion website, has been able to identify most of the speakers who he says include Peter Hodge of Ngati Whakaue, Te Irimana Waenga of Te Whanau-a-Apanui, Barney Kapuaroa of Gisborne, Tame (Thomas) Karena of Ngati Kahungunu, Kopu Heremia of Ngati Raukawa,, L/Sgt Hira Parata of Ngati Toa, Cpl Ripene Matoe of Ngati Ruanui and Hami Ngaheke of Ngati Pikiahu-Waewae.

It is hoped whanau and descendants of these men will listen to the recording through the website and maybe put names to the remaining unidentified voices.

Soutar says the recordings include interesting snippets such as an interview in Egypt with the victorious Māori Battalion rugby team captain Syd Jackson and coach Pine Taiapa, at the end of the 1943 Freyberg Cup final.

There are also recordings by Lt Rangi Logan (Ngati Kahungunu), Pte Bill Te Anga (Waikato, Maniapoto), Henare Toka (Ngapuhi), and Lt-Col Tiwi Love (Te Ati Awa), who was killed just months later, encouraging their iwi to send more reinforcements.

The Sound Archives and the website are continuing to work to create a comprehensive online collection of wartime recordings made by members of the 28th Maori Battalion, which will ensure their legacy remains alive and accessible for future generations.

The 28th Māori Battalion website is produced by Manatū Taonga/Ministry for Culture and Heritage with support from Te Puni Kokiri, on behalf of the 28 Māori Battalion Association and is a repository for archival photos, film and audio of the Battalion.

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Architecture:
Ian Athfield Dies In Wellington

New Zealand Institute of Architects: It is with great sadness that we inform Members that Sir Ian Athfield, one of New Zealand's finest architects, has passed away in Wellington. More>>

ALSO:

Wellington Production: New-Look Tracy Brothers Are F.A.B.

ITV and New Zealand’s Pukeko Pictures today released an exclusive preview of the new-look Tracy brothers from this year’s hotly anticipated new series, Thunderbirds Are Go. More>>

ALSO:

Cardinal Numbers:
Pope Francis Names Archbishop From NZ Among New Cardinals

Announcing a list of bishops to be made Cardinals in February Pope Francis named Archbishop John Dew, Archbishop of Wellington, overnight from Rome. On hearing the news of the announcement, Archbishop John Dew said "This news is recognition of the Catholic Church in Aotearoa New Zealand, and the contribution it makes to the global Catholic family." More>>

ALSO:

Nomenclature: Charlotte And Oliver Top Baby Names For 2014

Charlotte and Oliver were the most popular names for newborn girls and boys in 2014... The top 100 girls’ and boys’ names make up a small proportion of the more than 12,000 unique first names registered for children born this year, says Jeff Montgomery, Registrar-General of Births, Deaths and Marriage. More>>

Werewolf: Katniss Joins The News Team

From the outset, the Hunger Games series has dwelt obsessively on the ways that media images infiltrate our public and personal lives... From that grim starting point, Mockingjay Part One takes the process a few stages further. There is very little of the film that does not involve the characters (a) being on screens (b) making propaganda footage to be screened and (c) reacting to what other characters have been doing on screens. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Ko Witi Te Kaituhituhi

Witi Ihimaera, the distinguished Māori author and the first Māori to publish a book of short stories and a novel, has adopted a new genre with his latest book. But despite its subtitle, this book is a great deal more than a memoir of childhood. More>>

Werewolf: Rescuing Paul Robeson

Would it be any harder these days, for the US government to destroy the career of a famous American entertainer and disappear them from history – purely because of their political beliefs? You would hope so. In 1940, Paul Robeson – a gifted black athlete, singer, film star, Shakespearean actor and orator – was one of the most beloved entertainers on the planet. More>>

ALSO:

"Not A Competition... A Quest": Chapman Tripp Theatre Award Winners

Big winners on the night were Equivocation (Promising Newcomer, Best Costume, Best Director and Production of the Year), Kiss the Fish (Best Music Composition, Outstanding New NZ Play and Best Supporting Actress), and Watch (Best Set, Best Sound Design and Outstanding Performance). More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news