Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search


A couple of losers steal the show in new short

A couple of losers steal the show in new short

Latest animated release from Auckland's Media Design School

Auckland 30 November 2012: Fans of Clerks and Dazed and Confused rejoice, Media Design School offers a new spin on the slacker comedy with Shelved, a short film featuring computer-generated images (CGI) and visual effects.

Shelved is the story of two bumbling robots who are bored by their dead-end jobs, until they realise they are about to be replaced! The comedy is a nod towards the early films of directors Kevin Smith (Clerks, Mallrats) and Richard Linklater (Slacker, Dazed and Confused) and offers an ironic take on the recession-era redundancies of recent times.

Eleven Media Design School animation and visual effects students undertook 12 weeks of production, 5,460 hours of rendering and 6,300 hours of work to achieve the five minutes of animation.

“Students and industry collaborated to complete the film, with students handling all the special effects, pre-production and helping out with filming on the day. It is important for the students to get a real feel of what it is like to work in the industry, and to get them away from their computer screens and into the fierce pace of working for a live production,” said Shelved director James Cunningham, who is a senior 3D lecturer at Media Design School.

Shelved stars some of New Zealand’s top comedic talent including lead actors Simon McKinney and Stephen Papps, as well as Penny Ashton and Peter Rowley, all of whom were transformed into fully animated robots by the team of students.

Weta senior concept artist Greg Broadmore (District 9, Lord Of The Rings, King Kong) was also on board with the project, drawing the original robot sketches. It is not the first time he has collaborated with the school. In 2011, Broadmore worked with students to bring his characters to life in the short film Dr Grordbort Presents: The Deadliest Game.

The film is available on Vimeo and will screen at Event Cinemas, Queen Street to a VIP audience including Mayor Len Brown on December 18.


© Scoop Media

Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines


Werewolf Film: It Follows - Panic In Detroit

Philip Matthews: When you heard last month that Wes Craven had died and you wanted to pay homage, you could have sat down with any one of five of his films that helped reinvent American horror at least three times over three decades... Or you could just have watched one of the greatest recent horror films that would probably not exist without Craven. More>>


Werewolf Music: Searching For The White Wail - On Art Pepper, etc

If the word ‘hipster’ means anything – which it arguably doesn’t – it seems to be more of an impulse than a condition. One always headed for the margins, and away from the white-bred, white-bread mainstream... More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: Leonardo da Vinci - The Graphic Work

The breadth of da Vinci’s work is incredible: from animals to weaponry, architecture to fabric, maps to botany. The works have been divided into themes such as Proportion Drawings, Anatomical Drawings and Drawings of Maps and Plans. Each section begins with a short essay. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: James Hector: Explorer, Scientist, Leader

Publication of this comprehensive 274-page account of the life and work of James Hector by the Geoscience Society of New Zealand marks the 150th anniversary of James Hector’s appointment as New Zealand’s first government scientist. More>>

On Shoestrings And Phones: Rossellini And Contemporary Film

Howard Davis: Roberto Rossellini's Neo-Realist Rome, Open City provides some fascinating technical parallels to Tangerine, an equally revolutionary Independent movie made exactly seventy years later. More>>

Art Review: Fiona Pardington's A Beautiful Hesitation

An aroma of death and decay perfumes this extraordinary survey of Fiona Pardington's work with faint forensic scents of camphor and formaldehyde. Eight large-format still-lifes dominate the main room, while other works reveal progressive developments in style and subject-matter. More>>

Get More From Scoop



Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news