Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Weird and Wonderful re-opens tomorrow!

Weird and Wonderful re-opens tomorrow!

Our Weird & Wonderful summer What’s On has just come out – you should be getting it in your letterbox shortly but if you want a sneak peak you can check it out here. If you'd like to receive our What's On in the mail, sign up here


WEIRD AND WONDERFUL IS BACK!


Come and join us tomorrow from 10am to celebrate the return of our Weird & Wonderful Gallery. We’ve got a line-up of weird and wonderful activities throughout the day – get your face painted as your favourite creature, create your own crafty bug or meet some live creepy crawlies or Boris the famous TV turtle. And you’ll be the first to check out the revamped gallery with new interactive games and spaces and lots of your old favourites.

Read more here

MUSEUM SOLVES MISSING ISLAND MYSTERY

Last week The Guardian UK ran a story about the mysterious ‘disappearance’ of Sandy Island in the Pacific. Despite being noted on maps and Google Earth, the island was nowhere to be seen when a group of scientists sailed into the region but our pictorial librarian Shaun Higgins has looked in the museum’s vast collection of maps and solved the mystery – you can read what he found in his blog

Read The Guardian article here. Read Shaun's blog here

BLOG: JOHN BUCHANAN AND THE ART OF BOTANY

University of Auckland’s Linda Tyler wrote a fascinating blog about botanist John Buchanan’s notebook and the incredible illustrations that will appear in two exhibitions in coming months at the Hocken Library and the Gus Fisher Gallery – check out the stunning handdrawn botanical illustrations in the blog

Read Linda's blog entry here


VISIT SANTA IN HIS GROTTO


Tickets for our Christmas Night at the Museum are selling fast. Make sure you join us for carols, mulled wine, special Christmas stories and the chance to meet Santa in his grotto in our 1866 gallery. We’ll also have a Victorian Market with great presents from our museum shops so you can finish your Christmas shopping – and get it wrapped for free

Read more here


EXPERT SESSION WITH DAMIAN SKINNER

Join us this Thursday at 6.30pm to hear Damian Skinner, Curator of Applied Art and Design, discuss the recent European exhibition Metadomestic, curated by Monica Gaspar. The thought-provoking exhibition challenged the idea of design and craft in the domestic setting. This is also your first chance to meet Damian in his role as our Curator of Applied Art and Design.

Thursday 6 December, 6.30pm (cafe open 5.30pm). Read more here

PERFECT CHRISTMAS GIFTS

At our Museum Shops! From a great range of kids toys including some gorgeous retro games, to stunning, New Zealand-designed jewellery, prints and books. We’ve also got plenty of easy parking including our underground carpark which is free for the first hour – and if that wasn’t simple enough, we’ll wrap all your gifts for FREE.


A DINOSAUR-FILLED SUMMER

Basil the dinosaur has lived at Auckland Museum for seven years and this summer he’s creating his own guided tour of all its treasures. He’s picked the bits of the museum he loves best plus some of its best-kept secrets and put it all into a trail – from Dec 26 you can pick up one of his free trail maps when you visit the museum. If you want more of Basil, in January you can have him as your own, very special tour guide – you’ll have to book fast for these!

Read more here

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Obituary: Andrew Little Remembers Murray Ball

“Murray mined a rich vein of New Zealand popular culture and exported it to the world. Wal and Dog and all the other Kiwi characters he crafted through Footrot Flats were hugely popular here and in Australia, Europe and North America." More>>

ALSO:

Organised Choas: NZ Fringe Festival 2017 Awards

Three more weeks of organised chaos have come to an end with the Wellington NZ Fringe Arts Festival Awards Ceremony as a chance to celebrate all our Fringe artists for their talent, ingenuity, and chutzpah! More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Wellington Writer Wins $US165,000 Literature Prize

Victoria University of Wellington staff member and alumna Ashleigh Young has won a prestigious Windham-Campbell Literature Prize worth USD$165,000 for her book of essays Can You Tolerate This? More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: We’re All Lab Rats

A couple of years ago, there were reports that Silicon Valley executives were sending their children to tech-free schools. It was a story that dripped of irony: geeks in the heart of techno-utopia rejecting their ideology when it came to their own kids. But the story didn’t catch on, and an awkward question lingered. Why were the engineers of the future desperate to part their gadgets from their children? More>>

  • CensusAtSchool - Most kids have no screen-time limits
  • Netsafe - Half of NZ high school students unsupervised online
  • Get More From Scoop

     
     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
    Culture
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news