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Cyclists Cycle 1400km to Power Shift

Cyclists Cycle 1400km to Power Shift

Five cyclists left Dunedin on the 12th of November to embark on a 1400km journey to Auckland. Their unsupported cycle ride is expected to take 23 days, where they will arrive in Auckland on the 5th of December. They will have a media entrance the next day at 2.30 at the band rotunda in Albert Park.

Their numbers doubled on the 22nd as five more joined in Wellington, out of hundreds who wished the group bon voyage outside Te Papa. A further two joined at Waikanae, expanding the crew to 12, with 600km to go.

Awaiting them in Auckland is Power Shift New Zealand – Pacific, New Zealand’s first youth climate summit. The 3-day summit is to be hosted at the University of Auckland from the 7th to 9th of December 2012. The event gathers 1000 youth from the Pacific region to a weekend of workshops, inspirational speakers, and the launch of one of the biggest campaigns to push for climate solutions this corner of the world has ever seen.

Key speakers include Bill Mckibben (America), Naomi Klein (America), Antonio Te Maioha (Solomon Islands), Claire Anterea (Kiribati), Brianna Fruean (Samoa), Lucy Lawless (NZ), Councillor Jinty MacTavish (NZ), Dayle Takitimu (NZ), Mike Underhill (NZ), and Dr Sean Weaver (NZ). Over the three days, attendees will upskill, learn, be inspired, and be empowered to take action on climate change as youth.

Power Shift is a collaboration project between 350 Aotearoa (part of, Generation Zero and other individuals, and is modelled on the international Power Shift movement where summits already held in Australia, Canada and the United States have mobilized over 25,000 young people across the globe.

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