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Hillary Expedition Grant Recipients

Mountain Safety Council Congratulates Hillary Expedition Grant Recipients

The New Zealand Mountain Safety Council congratulates the seven teams awarded Hillary Expedition Grants by Sport New Zealand.

Almost 60 years ago Sir Edmund Hillary inspired us as a nation. In 2002, Sport NZ introduced the grants scheme with the objective of encouraging inspirational adventures, motivating others to challenge themselves in the great outdoors, and reinforcing New Zealand as a nation of great adventurers and achievers.

‘I am sure that this year’s grant recipients and the adventures they are going on will inspire New Zealanders to consider getting into the outdoors themselves,’ says New Zealand Mountain Safety Council Chief Executive Darryl Carpenter.

‘This reinforces one of our key messages this summer of ‘get into the great outdoors it’s good’ and these adventurers will go onto create their own inspiring stories for other New Zealanders to share,’ adds Carpenter.

One expedition features Mountain Safety Council instructor Bridget Janse who will be climbing New Zealand’s highest mountain Aoraki/Mount Cook as part of the Cook to Cook expedition with Sarah Wilson.

Bridget is a strong climber and will contribute significant risk management experience to the team. For a number of years she has volunteered her time to run first aid and other outdoor safety and technical training programmes for the Mountain Safety Council and her community.

‘It doesn't have to be an intrepid adventure to know that good planning and preparation is key to having a great time and coming back to tell the tale,’ says Carpenter.

The five simple rules of the Outdoor Safety Code provide guidance on how to prepare and act in the outdoors and are applicable to all land-based outdoor activities. Whether it’s a family walk in the bush, a day out mountain biking, hunting, camping or tramping, a full-on multi-day mountain adventure or even a Hillary expedition, the principles are the same.

‘Whatever your level of ability, whether you’re a first timer or highly experienced and heading to the extreme edge of adventure, I’d encourage you to carefully plan your own expedition safely, using the Outdoor Safety Code before going,’ says Carpenter.

The Mountain Safety Council also recommends outdoors enthusiasts take responsibility for their own safety by using the information and simple tools on the www.adventuresmart.org.nz website to ‘tell someone’ where they are going and the expected date and time of their return.

‘You can easily provide a friend or family member with all your trip details by downloading a form or you can complete details online and email it to them and the resources are free to use and who better to raise the alert than someone who really cares about you,’ added Carpenter.

Details, such as where you are going, who you are with and what equipment you have, can be left with a responsible person and are often called your ‘outdoors intentions’. Should the alert be raised, these details can then be provided to search and rescue agencies and will assist in locating and rescuing you quicker if something has gone wrong.

The New Zealand Outdoor Safety Code:

1. Plan your trip
Seek local knowledge and plan the route you will take and the amount of time you can reasonably expect it to take. Department of Conservation (DOC) Visitor Centres, i-SITEs and local operators are a good source of local information.

2. Tell someone
Tell someone your plans and complete written Outdoors Intentions BEFORE leaving on your trip. There are tools that make it easy on the www.adventuresmart.org.nz website. At the very least, tell a friend or family member where you are going and date and time to raise the alarm if you haven’t returned.

3. Be aware of the weather
New Zealand’s weather can be highly unpredictable. Check the forecast and expect weather changes. Check track and hut conditions. Beware of rivers – if in doubt STAY OUT.

4. Know your limits
Challenge yourself within your physical limits and experience. Take a Mountain Safety Council course.

5. Take sufficient supplies
Make sure you have enough food, clothing, equipment and emergency rations for the worst-case scenario. Take an appropriate means of communication such as a Mountain Radio or Personal Locator Beacon (PLB) and know how to use them.

For more information about how to enjoy New Zealand’s great outdoors safely this summer please visit www.mountainsafety.org.nz

ENDS

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