Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Backyard cricket survey – a nation divided

For immediate release

11 January 2013

Backyard cricket survey – a nation divided

Backyard and beach cricket are as much a part of the great Kiwi summer as cicadas and pohutukawa blossoms.

However, new research from Tourism Bay of Plenty has revealed the nation is divided over one of the central rules of the game – the LBW (Leg Before Wicket).

In a survey of 1033* adult New Zealanders, 27 per cent of respondents said LBW’s should be allowed in backyard or beach cricket, while 41 per cent said they weren’t in the spirit of the game. The remaining 32 per cent have little idea what a LBW is.

Tourism Bay of Plenty General Manager Rhys Arrowsmith, says beach cricket has been ubiquitous at local beaches over the New Year period.

“Backyard or beach cricket is a great tradition in New Zealand, as it is for our cousins across the ditch,” he says.

“Rules such as the ‘one hand, one bounce’ catch dismissal or the fact you are out if you hit the ball over the fence or into the water on the full are seldom in dispute. What does appear to be more contentious is the merit of the LBW rule.”

Mr. Arrowsmith said tourism owners and operators in the Bay of Plenty are enjoying a very good summer, which was pleasing after last year’s holiday season was impacted by the grounding of the MV Rena.

Tourism Bay of Plenty has compiled a top 10 list of regulations to consider when establishing your own ‘house rules’ for backyard cricket this summer:

1. One hand, one bounce: catches can be taken with one hand if the ball has bounced once
2. Six and out: the batsman is out if the ball is hit over the fence or into the water on the full
3. LBW: in or out - the decision is yours
4. Nick it and out (also known as auto wikky): any edges that go behind the wicket are automatically out
5. Tippity run: you have to run if you get bat to ball
6. You can’t go out first ball
7. Hit the house/bach: instant dismissal
8. Hit the person cooking the bbq or the bbq itself: instant dismissal
9. Standard over: unlike the six balls that is standard in an organised game of cricket, backyard bowlers can bowl continuously until queried by the fielders awaiting their turn
10. Running between wickets: purely optional

ENDS

* Survey conducted by Research Now, 11 – 17 December 2012.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Memorabilia: Te Papa Buys Peter Snell Singlet

Te Papa has purchased the singlet worn by Peter Snell at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics at an auction this morning at Cordy’s auction house in Auckland. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Women At The Centre

In the first chapter of her epic History of New Zealand Women, Barbara Brookes places a version of the Māori creation story alongside that of the Pākehā colonists, setting the scene for how each society saw women. The contrast is startling. More>>

In Auckland Art Gallery: A Tour Of Duty

I had already started my journey through the exhibited collections when an audio announcement about a guided tour to embark shortly from the foyer was made, I decided to join in. Why not? More>>

Art: ‘Holiday’ Wins IHC Art Awards

An intricate embroidered cushion by Wellington artist Jo-Anne Tapiki has won the 2016 IHC Art Awards and $5000. Jo-Anne started working from IHC’s Arts on High studio in Lower Hutt 18 months ago and this is the first time she has entered the competition. More>>

‘Quasi’: Christchurch Art Gallery Reveals Rooftop Sculpture

Christchurch-born and internationally renowned artist Ronnie van Hout has had a huge hand in Christchurch Art Gallery's latest outdoor installation. More>>

Obituary: Last 28th Maori Battalion A Company Veteran Dies

Charlie Petera, the final surviving member of A-Company of the 28th Maori Battalion has died at his home in Ngataki, Northland last night surrounded by his whanau. He was 91 years old. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news