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Backyard cricket survey – a nation divided

For immediate release

11 January 2013

Backyard cricket survey – a nation divided

Backyard and beach cricket are as much a part of the great Kiwi summer as cicadas and pohutukawa blossoms.

However, new research from Tourism Bay of Plenty has revealed the nation is divided over one of the central rules of the game – the LBW (Leg Before Wicket).

In a survey of 1033* adult New Zealanders, 27 per cent of respondents said LBW’s should be allowed in backyard or beach cricket, while 41 per cent said they weren’t in the spirit of the game. The remaining 32 per cent have little idea what a LBW is.

Tourism Bay of Plenty General Manager Rhys Arrowsmith, says beach cricket has been ubiquitous at local beaches over the New Year period.

“Backyard or beach cricket is a great tradition in New Zealand, as it is for our cousins across the ditch,” he says.

“Rules such as the ‘one hand, one bounce’ catch dismissal or the fact you are out if you hit the ball over the fence or into the water on the full are seldom in dispute. What does appear to be more contentious is the merit of the LBW rule.”

Mr. Arrowsmith said tourism owners and operators in the Bay of Plenty are enjoying a very good summer, which was pleasing after last year’s holiday season was impacted by the grounding of the MV Rena.

Tourism Bay of Plenty has compiled a top 10 list of regulations to consider when establishing your own ‘house rules’ for backyard cricket this summer:

1. One hand, one bounce: catches can be taken with one hand if the ball has bounced once
2. Six and out: the batsman is out if the ball is hit over the fence or into the water on the full
3. LBW: in or out - the decision is yours
4. Nick it and out (also known as auto wikky): any edges that go behind the wicket are automatically out
5. Tippity run: you have to run if you get bat to ball
6. You can’t go out first ball
7. Hit the house/bach: instant dismissal
8. Hit the person cooking the bbq or the bbq itself: instant dismissal
9. Standard over: unlike the six balls that is standard in an organised game of cricket, backyard bowlers can bowl continuously until queried by the fielders awaiting their turn
10. Running between wickets: purely optional

ENDS

* Survey conducted by Research Now, 11 – 17 December 2012.

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