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Coriolanus

Media Release for Immediate Use: Tuesday 15 January
From: The Bacchanals

CORIOLANUS
by William Shakespeare

24 January – 2 February, 7pm
Roseneath Long Hall, 13 Maida Vale Rd, Roseneath, Wellington
TICKETS: $10 BOOKINGS: tickets@thebacchanals.net or cash door sales

Like a flesh-hungry zombie that just won’t die, multi-award-winning theatre company The Bacchanals rise again to eat your brains with a brand new show this January! For their 24th show in their 13th birthday year, blood meets politics meets smothering mothers in Shakespeare’s most homoerotic play, Coriolanus!

Winning lots of battles makes Coriolanus the most popular guy in town, but when he is too proud to flatter the common people and let them eat cornflakes, the whole city turns on him and declares him an enemy of the state – but they are all unprepared for the terrible vengeance he decides to wreak upon them.

Coriolanus plays at The Long Hall in Roseneath from Thursday 24 JanuarySaturday 2 February at 7pm. The Long Hall is behind Roseneath School and St Barnabas’ – just get yourselves to the Roseneath shops and it’ll be signposted. The show only costs $10 and you’ll get a cup of tea in the middle; maybe even a biscuit if you’re very good! You can book tickets by e-mailing tickets@thebacchanals.net. As a guerrilla theatre company running on the smell of an oily rag that hasn’t seen oil since before decimal currency, we don’t have eftpos or credit card facilities, and you should probably bring a cushion with you and be aware that blood might go everywhere, front row.

Coriolanus stars the mighty Alex Greig in the title role, with Bacchanals stalwarts Salesi Le’ota as his friend Menenius, Jean Sergent as his mother Volumnia, Kirsty Bruce as his wife Virgilia, Joe Dekkers-Reihana as his great enemy Aufidius, Brianne Kerr and Walter Plinge as the scheming tribunes Sicinius and Brutus, Michael Ness as the general Cominius, Dasha Fedchuk as Valeria and Hilary Penwarden as Titus Lartius, plus Tony Black, Amy Griffin-Browne, Rosanagh Kynoch, Hugo Randall, Morgan Rothwell, Rebecca Sim and Lauren Wilson as the citizens of Rome. The show is designed by Bronwyn Cheyne and Charlotte Simmonds, and directed by David Lawrence.

The Bacchanals have been doing shows all over New Zealand since 2000. They want you to have a good time with them and go away thinking a bit harder about the world you live in. You could visit their website at www.thebacchanals.net if you want to know more about them; you could follow them on Twitter @thebacchanals or poke them on MyFace here: https://www.facebook.com/TheBacchanalsNZ

ENDS

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