Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search


New Zealand love activist talks Valentine's Day

The most complex human emotion: simplified
Holistic living expert, love activist gets to the heart of the issue

TAURANGA, New Zealand – Love today is often measured by materialistic treasures, as evidenced by the increasing number of dollars spent to commemorate commercial holidays such as Valentine’s Day.

Rather than looking in your pocket book for the meaning of love, look inward and to the world around you, says educator and love activist Kimaya.

In her new book, All the Flavours of Love, Kimaya argues that love is a gift that brings into our lives gentleness, compassion and a deeper wisdom about the things in life that are truly important.

“Society has a habit of promoting individualism and encouraging competition, which can be damaging to our long term health and wellness,” Kimaya says. “Studies show that competitive self- esteem is related to larger societal problems such as loneliness, segregation and prejudice.”

Speaking to the complexity of this human emotion in a simplistic manner through bright, bold illustrations and short lines of text, Kimaya spreads messages of love and positivity to children of all ages.

“My book is about the sacred relationship we can each have with ourselves, others and the world around us when we are centered in love,” Kimaya says. “To see love in every moment is a gift that each of us - children and adults - can give to ourselves, and ultimately society as a whole.”

For more information, visit

All the Flavours of Love
By Kimaya
ISBN: 978-1452506494
Approx. 40 pages
Paperback 6x9
Retail price: $13.95
E-book price: $3.99
Available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Balboa Press

About the author
Kimaya is a member of the New Zealand Author’s Society, Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) and is actively involved in children’s events in her local community. Along with writing, Kimaya’s professional background lies in holistic health and wellness. Kimaya lives with her family and pets on a small farm overlooking the sea in Tauranga, New Zealand.


© Scoop Media

Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines


13/10: 40 Years Since The Māori Land March Arrived At Parliament

Traffic into Wellington came to a standstill as thousands of Māori and Pākehā streamed along the motorway into the capital on 13 October 1975, concluding the Māori land march to parliament. More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: Before The Quakes

Remembering Christchurch: Voices from decades past: The Christchurch I lived in for my first 23 years was where four-year-olds walked alone to kindergarten, crossing roads empty of all but a couple of cars per hour. My primary school, Ilam, was newly built on a grassy paddock surrounded by rural land... More>>

6-11 October: New Zealand Improvisation Festival Hits Wellington

Wellingtonians will have a wide selection of improv to feast on with a jam packed programme containing 22 shows, three companies from Australia, two companies from Auckland, one from Nelson, one from Christchurch and seven from Wellington. More>>


Bird Of The Year: New Zealanders Asked To Vote For Their Favourite Native Bird

Te Radar, David Farrier, Heather du-Plessis Allan and Duncan Garner are just some of the New Zealanders championing their favourite native bird in Forest & Bird’s annual Bird of the Year competition, which kicks off today.. More>>


Werewolf Film: It Follows - Panic In Detroit

Philip Matthews: When you heard last month that Wes Craven had died and you wanted to pay homage, you could have sat down with any one of five of his films that helped reinvent American horror at least three times over three decades... Or you could just have watched one of the greatest recent horror films that would probably not exist without Craven. More>>


Werewolf Music: Searching For The White Wail - On Art Pepper, etc

If the word ‘hipster’ means anything – which it arguably doesn’t – it seems to be more of an impulse than a condition. One always headed for the margins, and away from the white-bred, white-bread mainstream... More>>


Get More From Scoop



Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news