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Feel a million miles away this summer with a Ruapehu escape

Media release
17.01.2013

Feel a million miles away this summer with a Ruapehu escape

With summer in full swing, there has never been a better time to visit one of New Zealand’s most iconic destinations.

Within a four hour drive from Auckland and Wellington, the Ruapehu region offers more than just snow sports in the winter, with year round attractions and great summer escapes on offer that take advantage of the spectacular landscape, making visitors feel a million miles away from the city.

The Ruapehu region is home to two of the 19 Great Trail Rides that make up the New Zealand Cycle Trail network and is the perfect mountain biking adventure destination. As well as mountain biking, there is an abundance of summer attractions on offer such as hiking, jet boating, fishing, canoeing, kayaking, rafting, flight seeing, four-wheel driving, golfing and horse riding.

To enable city dwellers to make the escape from the city even easier, Visit Ruapehu has put together six Escape the City packages showcasing the best that the region has to offer giving people the opportunity to win online through the Visit Ruapehu website.

Visit Ruapehu general manager, Mike Smith says few regions in the world can boast short and multi day hikes in not one but two national parks, Tongariro National Park and Whanganui National Park’s, as well as Dual World Heritage areas.

“If mountain biking is more your thing, whatever your ability, the Ruapehu region has a ride for you. Book a weekend bring your bikes or hire locally and discover the many trails in the centre of New Zealand's North Island”.

“As well as adventure activities, the region boasts a wide range of accommodation and dining experiences, as well as value for money options suits every budget. The ideal weekend destination, the Ruapehu region is close to the main North Island cities, yet it feels a million miles away from the city,” says Mr Smith.

The newly opened Timber Trail is part of the New Zealand Cycle Trail network and follows historic tramways, old logging tracks and newly created tracks, combining trails for a range of abilities suitable for beginners and families as well as experienced mountain bikers, filled with stunning scenery and rich cultural heritage. The trail itself has a pumice surface and provides good riding conditions all year round. The full Timber Trail is due to open in April 2013, and will be a 2-day ride spanning 84km, the trail is rated at a grade 2 level.

The ‘Escape’ campaign will run for 12 weeks commencing Sunday 14th January and will end on Sunday April 7th 2012.

To enter the competition, visit www.visitruapehu.com


ENDS

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