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Bungy jumpers and skydivers – jump to save the children!

Calling all bungy jumpers and skydivers – jump to save the children


MEDIA RELEASE

Harness yourself to a bungy cord or jump out of an airplane (you know you want to!) and use that life moment to change the life of a child. Stepping off the edge will never be more meaningful.

Take part in a fun-filled extreme fundraising event on 23–24 February through the Gravity Gives Project (GGP) and raise money for Save the Children New Zealand.

“Thrill seekers and adventurists alike will have a chance to strike one off their bucket list! Individuals who have a goal of trying something new and exhilarating this year can use it to benefit others,” said GGP founder Greg Nelson.

“Our vision is to champion a brighter future for children in need around the world by uniting the energy, passion and daring of the global extreme sports community. A unique concept, GGP is an international effort that brings skydivers and bungy jumpers together under one banner to support one cause.”

Bungy and skydiving centres around New Zealand, including Skydive Franz (Josef) and AJ Hackett Bungy, are gearing up for this exciting event and are encouraging participants to register online on the Gravity Gives Project website. Individual jumpers and teams are all welcome to take part and raise funds by getting friends, family and colleagues to sponsor them.

“There is no better time to make good on a New Year resolution to help others or be more charitable than right now. Supporting an organisation such as Save the Children can be rewarding and exciting in one fell swoop!” said Kay Enoka, acting chief executive of Save the Children New Zealand.

“We are always grateful for people who give of their time and effort to raise money so that children here and overseas can have some of the opportunities many of us take for granted,” she said.

To register, or for more information about this event and dates on future events, or to submit a donation to the project, visit www.gravitygivesproject.org
ENDS

Notes to editor
Registration is free. Participants:
• pick their date (23 or 24 February) and contact their local bungy centre or drop zone to reserve their jump
• register on the Gravity Gives Project website indicating the date of their jump
• have their friends, family and colleagues sponsor their jump by making donations directly through the website.
All donations go directly to Save the Children New Zealand.

The Gravity Gives Project (GGP) is a non-profit organisation made up of volunteers. It was founded in 2009 by thrill seeker and Canadian, Greg Nelson, who bungee jumped 12 times from the 220m (728ft) Verzasca Dam in Switzerland for charity. This experience was literally the springboard to harnessing the energy of skydiving and bungee jumping to raise funds for charity.

Today the Gravity Gives Project is an international effort comprised of a network of veteran and first-time jumpers in countries around the world. Follow on:
• Twitter @gravitygivespro
LinkedIn
Facebook

Later in the year Canada, the US, the UK and Italy will hold this event (their summer).

Save the Children is the world’s leading independent organisation for children. We operate in 120 countries, including in New Zealand. We work to save and improve children’s lives in education, health and nutrition, child rights, child protection, HIV and AIDS and emergencies.

We work together with our partners to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives.

Save the Children New Zealand operates in New Zealand, the Pacific and Asia, and we help children in emergencies around the world.

In New Zealand our 4Good Leadership Programme enables children and young people to develop the leadership and advocacy skills to make their voices heard. In the aftermath of the 2011 Canterbury earthquake, we provided the Journey of Hope programme, which continues today. Journey of Hope helps children, families and caregivers develop coping strategies and build resilience for the future.

Find out more about Save the Children New Zealand at: www.savethechildren.org.nz Follow on:
• Twitter @SaveChildrenNZ
Facebook

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