Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Film: The Age of Stupid



Listing details: The Age of Stupid film screening
When: 7pm Wed – Sat, Jan 30 through Feb 2
Where: The New Zealand Film Archive, 84 Taranaki St, Wellington
Ticket price: $8 public / $6 concession
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

The Age of Stupid
The Age of Stupid (2009) is a docudrama on the catastrophic effects of climate change. Set in 2055, Pete Postlethwaite’s archivist is the sole human survivor of a series of apocalyptic events set off by global warming. He looks back at video archives showing the mistakes of our generation that catalyzed these happenings.

As the Sydney Opera House is consumed by flames, the London Eye is submerged in a flooded Thames, and the French Alps become dry and barren, Postlethwaite’s archivist desperately implores: “Why didn't we stop climate change when we still had the chance?”

The independent film intertwines the archivist’s story with real footage from today. The story is intercut with news reports and interviews with people who are currently considered experts on climate change, as well as people who stand to be affected by it.

Interviewees include a Indian entrepreneur struggling to launch a new low cost airline, a Shell employee in New Orleans who rescued more than 100 people during Hurricane Katrina, an 82 year old French mountain guide watching his beloved glaciers melt, two Iraqi refugee children searching for their elder brother, a young woman living in desperate poverty in Nigeria’s richest oil area and a wind farm developer in Britain battling protesting locals who don't want his turbines to spoil their view.

“It follows the lives of six people [...] caught up in the politics of climate breakdown. Starring Pete Postlethwaite, it is a captivating and constantly surprising film: the first successful dramatisation of climate change to reach the big screen.” - The Guardian

“So tightly constructed and dynamic you leave the cinema energised rather than terrified... hits home like a hammer blow” - ABC Australia

The Age of Stupid was directed by award-winning filmmaker Franny Armstrong, who also directed Drowned Out (2002) and McLibel (2005).

The Age of Stupid will screen at the Film Archive from January 30th through February 2nd.


ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Max Rashbrooke: Review - The NZSO And Nature

This was a lovely, varied concert with an obvious theme based on the natural world. It kicked off with Mendelssohn's sparkling Hebrides Overture, which had a wonderfully taut spring right from the start, and great colour from the woodwinds, especially the clarinets. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news