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Cautious First Step In Wof Reform Welcomed By NZFOMC

Media Release January 27 2013

Cautious First Step In Wof Reform Welcomed By NZFOMC

The NZ Federation of Motoring Clubs commends the Government for its cautious but positive first step to reduce the multi-million dollar costs imposed on motorists by the current WOF regime. “But retaining six monthly warrant checks for cars built before 2000 does nothing to curb the costs imposed on the large group of collectors and enthusiasts who preserve our heritage vehicles for the benefit of all New Zealanders,” says NZFOMC National Secretary Roy Hughes.

Even the Motor Trade Association agreed there should be an exemption from six monthly warrants for heritage and collector vehicles which usually only cover very low mileages each year and are often fully restored to as new condition or meticulously maintained by their owners, said Mr Hughes.

Most collectors own more than one heritage or special interest vehicle, and more than half are paying between $90 and $360 in WOF fees each year. A survey of FOMC members found just over 85 per cent reported none of their vehicles had failed an inspection in the last 12 months for brake, tyre or lighting related faults.

The majority of the respondents to the FOMC survey were in favour of 12 month WOFs for vehicles 30 years old and over. Less than 10 per cent supported retaining the current six monthly inspection regime, while 18 per cent favoured exempting heritage vehicles from WOF inspections altogether as is now the law for pre-1960 vehicles in the United Kingdom.

However the FOMC also commends the Government for leaving open avenues for further reforms to reduce the costs imposed on motorists, and will be taking advantage of the opportunity to suggest other ways the fees and charges imposed on car collectors can be curbed.


© Scoop Media

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