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Impress your loved one with a romantic night at the Zoo

Impress your loved one with a romantic night at the Zoo

Treat your loved one this Valentine’s Day with a romantic evening in beautiful, natural surroundings.

The Zoo is open this Valentine’s Day from 5pm-8.30pm for visitors aged 18 years and over. Take the time to drink in your surroundings, learn about some of our amazing animals, or bond with your special someone as you help us build love shacks for Little Blue Penguins!

For an even more romantic experience, you can book a dinner for two at Kamala's; which includes Zoo entry, a beautiful three course dinner, and wine or soft drinks, or a gourmet picnic hamper so that you can find your own cozy spot to enjoy the evening. You can check out the menu here.

Live music will be performed by the Wellington Heads at Kamala’s to entertain diners and dreamy wanderers alike.

A cash bar will also be open at The Tuck Shop, by Kamala’s. To make your evening unforgettable, book a special after hours close encounter.

All proceeds from this special evening help us with our conservation projects and animal care, making us the perfect setting for that special someone in your life

We have Red Panda, Cheetah, Big Cat and Giraffe Encounters available, but spaces are limited on the night, so be sure to book ahead online .

Regular entry on the night is $21 - or you are welcome to use your Zoo Crew membership.

You are welcome to bring your own picnic, but please note that you are not able to bring your own alcohol.

A very special guest at The Nest
Rare Chatham Island Taiko

Wellington Zoo has welcomed a critically endangered Chatham Island Taiko that was flown to the Zoo last week from the Chatham Islands to be treated by the team at The Nest Te Kōhanga.

The juvenile seabird is one of the world’s rarest bird species with current population estimates ranging between 120 to 150 birds with only 17 known breeding pairs.

The birds are also known as Magenta Petrels and only breed at the Chatham Islands.
Dr Lisa Argilla and the veterinary team at The Nest Te Kōhanga will now run tests to attempt to diagnose what is wrong with the sick bird.

This is only the second Taiko to be bought to mainland New Zealand – with the first also treated at The Nest Te Kōhanga and then successfully released in 2011.

It is thought Chatham Island Taiko once bred in huge numbers in the southwest of Chatham Island before the species was driven to the brink of extinction by introduced mammalian predators. They declined to the point they were considered extinct until 1978 when a small number were rediscovered by New Zealand ornithologist David Crockett.

Without continuing work by DOC and the Taiko Trust to protect the adults and young from introduced mammalian predators the species would rapidly become extinct.

Taiko nest in burrows two to five metres in length. Breeding pairs will use the same burrow each year and usually mate for life with the same partner. A single white egg is laid in November or December. Both parents share incubation of the egg which lasts 55 days. Once the chick hatches around the middle of January both parents feed the chick for approximately 105 days until it is ready to fledge.

When the chick is ready to fledge and depart out to sea, it will climb a tree in the dense forest and launch itself for the five kilometre flight to the coast and out to the South Pacific Ocean. The Taiko chicks then remain at sea for three to four years until they are ready to return to the Chatham Islands, find a mate and breed themselves.

Share your views on the Zoo!
We'd love to hear what you think

As part of our Zoo community, we value your opinion. We'd love for your to take a minute to share your thoughts on your latest Zoo visit on TripAdvisor, which you can do here.

Book a Close Encounter now!

Book your Valentine's day dinner or hamper now!


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