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Sounds Aotearoa Showcase Artists Announced


Sounds Aotearoa Showcase Artists Announced

EVERYONE’S INVITED TO SEE THE VERY BEST CONTEMPORARY MĀORI AND PACIFIC MUSICIANS PERFORM AT AOTEAROA’S INDIGENOUS MUSIC EXPO

10am – 5pm, Sunday 10 March
10am – 7pm, Monday 11 March
Festival Club, Aotea Square, and the Aotea Centre, Auckland


Auckland Arts Festival and Sounds Aotearoa are delighted announce the thrilling lineup of performers in this year’s Sounds Aotearoa music showcase series. Members of the public are invited to attend one or both days of the two-day event to hear some of the very best Maori and Pacific musical talent Aotearoa has to offer.

New Zealand’s only indigenous music expo will take place on Sunday 10 and Monday 11 March as part of Auckland Arts Festival 2013. The confirmed Sounds Aotearoa showcase performers are Maisey Rika; Louis Baker; Will Crummer & The Rarotongans (with special guest Annie Crummer); Ria Hall; Miss Black & The Light; Moana & The Tribe; Tama Waipara; Toni Huata; Waiora (Horomana Horo and Roger Cunningham); Syd, Pieter T and Dei Hamo; Funkommunity; Koile and Awanui Reeder.

Every 40 minutes in the Festival Club, from 1pm on Sunday 10 March and 3.00pm on Monday 11 March, audiences can enjoy a live performance by one of the finest Māori and Pacific musicians from around the country. Sounds Aotearoa attendees need to purchase a day pass ($35 per day) to see six performances, from solo artists to large bands, per day. The scheduled performance times will be released in late February.

According to Sounds Aotearoa Creative Director, Emere Wano, “Sounds Aotearoa invites audiences to journey into a world of contemporary Māori music – to experience the musical mastery of a multitude of Māori and Pacific musicians. At the showcases, visitors can experience Aotearoa’s unique and special sounds, from traditional Te Reo Maori performers to contemporary bands, vocalists and musicians.”

As well as the performance series, Sounds Aotearoa also offers learning opportunities for New Zealand musicians. The Sounds speaker seminar series helps musicians stay abreast of what is happening in the wider industry and learn more about the music scene’s many facets.

2013 seminar speakers include Jung Hun Lee, General Director at Ulsan World Music Festival; Karen Fischer from Hawaii’s Pacific Artists Network; Producer for Showcase Scotland at Celtic Connections, Lisa Whytock; Singapore Grand Prix’s Director of Operations Sarah Martin; Tommy Dick, Executive Producer for Fest’Napuan (Vanuatu); Raggamuffin New Zealand Director Jackie Sanders; and Nathan Graves, Creative Producer for Innate Music (UK).

Auckland Arts Festival Chief Executive, David Inns, said, “We are thrilled to welcome this pioneering event and celebration of Maori and Pacific music and musicianship to Auckland and the Auckland Arts Festival – propelling the very best local talent into the world arena is one of the Festival’s priorities. Sounds Aotearoa allows the public to catch performances by some of the country’s best indigenous musicians and the musicians to perform in front of all the right people at one time. We’re delighted to support an event that is so committed to growing NZ talent and subsequently contributes so significantly to the industry as a whole.”

For more information including ongoing updates of speakers and events, please visit www.aaf.co.nz

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