Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


One Plus One (Exploring the Kinsey Reports)

Listing details: One Plus One (Exploring the Kinsey Reports) film screening
When: 7pm, Wed through Sat, February 13 - 16
Where: The New Zealand Film Archive, 84 Taranaki St Wellington
Ticket price: $8 public / $6 concession

One Plus One (Exploring the Kinsey Reports)


Credit: One Plus One (Exploring the Kinsey Reports) (1961).

First up in The New Zealand Film Archive’s 2013 “Treasures from the Vaults” series is the 1961 film, One Plus One (Exploring the Kinsey Reports). The film is a fictionalised take on the research of sexologist Dr Alfred Kinsey.

Kinsey had shocked and titillated North America with his studies, Sexual Behaviour in the Human Male (1948) and Sexual Behaviour in the Human Female (1953), which revealed the bedroom habits of 12,000 Americans.

Riding on the crest of the sexual revolution, One Plus One attempts to understand some of Kinsey’s findings by presenting a series of vignettes on the significance of sex in the lives of a diverse group of characters. The film consists of five separate but interwoven episodes, each dealing with different aspects of Kinsey’s research: “Honeymoon” (pre-marital relations), “Homecoming” (extra-marital relations), “The Divorcee” (promiscuity among the divorced), “Average Man” (sexual problems of the “average” man), and “Baby” (a story of abortion).

The cast is headed by the droll Leo G. Carroll, who you might recognise from Tarantula (1955) or as one of Hitchcock’s favourite character actors. Carroll’s professor character gives a lecture that links the various different dramatic and comedic episodes together.

The independently produced Canadian film baffled reviewers by presenting a mature perspective on its racy subject matter. A Los Angeles Times reviewer remarked that One Plus One is “too reasonable for sexploitation on the one hand and too reasonable for the art house on the other” (24 August 1961). Similarly, Variety noted the film’s lack of appeal for “the sensation-seeked,” expressing concern that “by proclaiming itself to be an exploration of the Kinsey reports, as its title so invitingly puts it, the film is likely to attract too many of the wrong people for the wrong reasons” (23 August 1961).

The film was promoted as "A motion picture for YOU - who have loved... are loved... or want love..."

This rarely screened gem is not to be missed.

One Plus One will screen at the Film Archive at 7pm, February 13 -16.

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Photos: Inside The Christchurch Arts Centre Rebuild

Lady Pippa Blake visited Christchurch Arts Centre chief executive André Lovatt, a 2015 recipient of the Blake Leader Awards. The award celebrated Lovatt’s leadership in New Zealand and hisand dedication to the restoration of the Arts Centre. More>>

Running Them Up The Flagpole: Web Tool Lets Public Determine New Zealand Flag

A School of Design master’s student is challenging the flag selection process by devising a web tool that allows the public to feed their views back in a way, he says, the current government process does not. More>>

ALSO:

Survey: ‘The Arts Make My Life Better’: New Zealanders

New Zealanders are creative people who believe being involved in the arts makes their lives better and their communities stronger. Nine out of ten adult New Zealanders (88%) agree the arts are good for them and eight out of ten (82%) agree that the arts help to improve New Zealand society. More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Reprieve For Te Papa Press

Following its review of the role of Te Papa Press, Te Papa has committed to continue publishing books during the museum’s redevelopment, Chief Executive Rick Ellis announced yesterday. More>>

Law Society: Sir Peter Williams QC, 1934 - 2015

“Sir Peter was an exceptional advocate. He had the ability to put the defence case for his clients with powerful oratory. His passion shone through in everything he did and said.” Mr Moore says Sir Peter’s lifelong commitment to prison reform was instrumental in ensuring prison conditions and the rights of prisoners were brought to public attention. More>>

ALSO:

CTU: Peter Conway – Family Statement

Peter committed his whole working life to improving the lives of working people, both in unions and, more recently, as the Economist and Secretary of the Council of Trade Unions. He was previously Chair of Oxfam New Zealand and was on the Board of NZ Trade and Enterprise. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news