Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Middle Age Spread


Middle Age Spread

The Film Archive screens John Reid’s hilarious film adaptation of Roger Hall’s play. Middle Age Spread (1979) is no mere parading of middle class morality. Wit and thoughtfulness are judiciously mixed. And there is a bonus in the excellent original music by Stephen McCurdy.

Middle Age Spread centres on Colin, the deputy principal of a city high school. He’s a reluctant applicant for the principal’s job, but the pressures of school life don’t encourage him to seek this promotion.

At home, his wife Elizabeth has settled into the role of an increasingly disinterested partner. As the film begins, she’s giving a dinner party to which four friends have been invited. One of them is Judy, a teacher who has had a temporary job at Colin’s school. She’s with her husband but the two have had a long separation and have been reconciled only for the sake of the children.

Two other neighbours complete the dinner party and what happens during the evening makes for a unique “comedy of bad manners.”

The dinner party is only a part of this film – flashbacks reveal the secrets of all the dinner guests, most importantly the slow-growing love affair between Colin (who has taken up jogging in an effort to combat his spreading waistline) and Judy. The climax, which ends the dinner and also the film, is electric.

“Roger Hall’s play, and Keith Aberdein’s script bring the feelings and fears of this rampantly middle-class, slightly weathered, uncomfortably ‘real’ bevy of people together under one roof to begin their comic dissection of our days in suburbia and beyond. Set around ‘a dinner party’ these six people are the trappings of (products of?) and trapped by their own self-inflicted materialistic greed – people, who it seems, have got everything, but end up with nothing more, nothing less… The film is at its most hilarious when pinpointing acute areas of pretense, leaving very few subjects untouched that are dear to all our hearts... The cast, the crew, producer and director (plus of course the two writers) are to be congratulated. They have made a very valid, and truthfully reflective film. It’s also bloody funny, if I neglected to make that point!” - Michael Heath, Evening Post, 30 June 1979

The Middle Age Spread will screen at the Film Archive, Wellington, at 7pm on February the 20th, 21st, 22nd and 23rd.


ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Review: Singin’ In The Rain

Singin’ in the Rain , the wet and wonderful musical production all the way from London’s West End, officially opened at St. James Theatre in Wellington. More>>

Francis Cook: Gallipoli: The Scale Of Our War – First Look

Te Papa today allowed media access to their new exhibition Gallipoli: The Scale of Our War . The exhibition was curated with help from Weta Workshop to deliver an immersive, realistic and even disorienting experience. More>>

ALSO:

Bats Theatre: Letters From The Front Brings ANZAC Letters Alive

Inspired by centenary commemorations, improv troupe Best on Tap is producing a show based on real-life letters sent to and from New Zealand soldiers in the First World War. More>>

ALSO:

Publishing: Unity Books On Plan To Close Te Papa Press

Unity Books is alarmed that Te Papa is proposing to suspend publishing by Te Papa Press for 4 or 5 years. Te Papa Press has proven time and time again that it has both award and bestseller capability and fulfils its kaupapa. More>>

ALSO:

Cinema: ‘The Desk’ Featuring Paul Henry To Have NZ Debut

The Documentary Edge Festival is thrilled to announce The Desk as a late entry to its 2015 Programme. The film, featuring local broadcaster Paul Henry, will have its international premiere on May 21 at 10pm at Q Theatre (book now at qtheatre.co.nz) with limited screenings also on offer in Wellington and Auckland. More>>

ALSO:

Art: Considering Feminisms In Aotearoa New Zealand: Two Projects

Feminism is something that has changed our lives. Recently, the activist Marilyn Waring reviewed the impact of feminism in Aotearoa New Zealand and reminded us that just 40 years ago banks wouldn’t lend women money without the guarantee of a man, ... More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news