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Jack Dee On Tour


“…turns grumpiness into an art form”
The Evening Standard

Book at 0800 ticketek

After a six year absence from Stand-Up, Jack Dee is back, agonizing over the slightest of annoyances and misdemeanors. Why is he touring again? “I want to spend less time with my family” says Jack.

Jack Dee is an actor, comedian and writer who has won world wide acclaim for his stand up comedy routines. Having forged a highly successful comedic reputation during the 1990s based on the sardonic, deadpan style of his stand up routine, Jack Dee shot to even greater fame in 2001 after he won the very first series of Celebrity Big Brother.

Jack’s comedy career began with an open mike spot at the Comedy Store in 1986. His talent was spotted early on by fellow comedians who encouraged him to continue to work on his act and start touring.

Jack Dee’s first big break came when he won the prestigious British Comedy Award for Best Stage Newcomer in 1991. This award led to his own show on Channel 4, The Jack Dee Show, which was first aired in 1992 and ran for two series. The show was critically acclaimed and resulted in a move to ITV where Jack hosted Jack Dee’s Saturday Night in 1995 and Jack Dee’s Sunday Service in 1997.

“A little ray of sleet”
Jeremy Hardy

Apart from his deadpan delivery and solemn face, Dee employed no gimmicks, but simply stood at the microphone and delivered a cleverly written stream of patter, most of it created from his apparent anger at certain aspects of society – this vitriol being all the more effective for its sneering but calm delivery.

I read in my local newspaper, ‘Please look after your neighbours in the cold weather’. Shall I tell you something about that? I live next door to this 84-year-old woman and, do you know, not once has she come round to see if I’m all right. The lazy cow hasn’t even taken her milk in for a fortnight

In 2000, Jack moved to the BBC where he presented two series of Jack Dee’s Happy Hour and hosted his BAFTA nominated show Jack Dee Live at the Apollo in 2004. Jack Dee Live at the Apollo was a runaway hit and a second series aired in 2005.

In 2006, Jack Dee co-wrote Lead Balloon, a semi-biographical sitcom which follows the trials and tribulations of Rick Spleen a disillusioned comedian and writer. The third series of Lead Balloon started on BBC 2 in 2008.

A regular on The Graham Norton Show, Jack has also appeared on New Zealand screens as guest host of BBC Two’s satirical music-based quiz show Never Mind the Buzzcocks, currently screening on Prime TV.

Performing as part of the 2013 NZ International Comedy Festival

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