Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Community volunteers celebrate stream restoration

Community volunteers celebrate stream restoration with art post dedication

Volunteers from the Henderson Valley Ward of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, the Supervised Group Home Henderson; Child, Youth and Family; and The Corrections Department will gather together at 10.30am on Saturday 23rd February at the Opanuku stream in Henderson to commemorate the years they have spent restoring the streamside.

The Opanuku stream has been degraded by pollution from storm-water run-off, deforestation and urban development, but this hard-working group of community volunteers have been restoring it back to health. They have transformed their chosen area of the stream into a flourishing, welcoming place to visit by planting native trees and keeping invasive weeds away.

As many as up to 70 people at any one time aged from 2 to 82 years old regularly gathered together to clear invasive weeds, plant natives, mulch and clear away broken glass and rubbish such as tyres, shopping trolleys and household waste.

For the church it began as part of its International Mormon Helping Hands program which brings together members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and their neighbours to provide a community service. Staff members and young people from the Henderson Supervised Group Home of Child, Youth and Family later supported and contributed to the weeding, planting and mulching of trees.

The Department of Corrections also contributed with maintaining the area and working hard to keep it weed free.

This group is an incredible example of very different members of one community working together to enhance the environment at their own back door. They will celebrate by weeding, clearing rubbish from the Opanuku stream and unveiling an art post they have made themselves.

Begun under Auckland Council-funded Project Twin Streams, over the last 5 years there have been over 300 people between the three organisations that have contributed to the success of this area, including McLaren Park Henderson South Community Initiative (MPHS) who have managed the Opanuku Stream community engagement contract since 2009.

For more information please visit http://projecttwinstreams.com/?page_id=95

About Project Twin Streams
Project Twin Streams is New Zealand’s largest-scale environmental restoration project. It is working to improve water quality in Waitakere streams by revegetating 56 kms of streambanks with native trees and shrubs, and purchasing properties within the flood plain for removal. This stabilises the banks from erosion, creates a cool, shaded environment for ecology to thrive and filters toxins entering the streams.

Through its unique approach, Project Twin Streams engages local residents in the project through partnering with local community organisations to deliver the planting program. Project Twin Streams is a local project with regional benefits. It works with nature and with people to improve the health of our waterways and harbour.

About the Opanuku Stream
The Opanuku Stream flows from high in the Waitakere Ranges down through Henderson Valley, to the tidal waters of Henderson Creek. The Project Twin Streams Opanuku Stream area spans from Candia Road in the upper reaches to Corban Estate in the lower reaches. This encompasses areas of mature bush as well as newly planted sites.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Max Rashbrooke: Review - The NZSO And Nature

This was a lovely, varied concert with an obvious theme based on the natural world. It kicked off with Mendelssohn's sparkling Hebrides Overture, which had a wonderfully taut spring right from the start, and great colour from the woodwinds, especially the clarinets. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news